JAMES MILNE / MILL, Mentor of Frances Wright

  • Very interesting material here, including support for Dewitt's contention that according to Epicurus "LIFE ITSELF" was the "greatest good." Note also the discussion on how "the distinction between good and bad pleasures did not make sense." I found this page because I am looking into Jame Milne as a potential mentor and/or collaborator and/or ghost writer of "A Few Days In Athens" but this material is interesting on its own.



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    Note: As to collaboration and/or ghost writing, I have no desire to take any credit from Frances Wright, but I simply cannot see how the same person who had the insight to write "A Few Days In Athens" could not write anything else at all about Epicurus for the rest of her life, as it appears was the case for Frances Wright. I have long thought that the "aside" within AFDIA where she criticizes the philosopher whose work was virtually Epicurean without giving credit to Epicurus is a major tip as to the origin of the book.

  • From James Milne's "Essays" (On Government and Jurisprudence)


    "We may allow, for example, in general terms, that the lot of every human being is determined by his pains and pleasures; and that his happiness corresponds with the degree in which his pleasures are great, and his pains are small..."


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