Welcome Mike Anyayahan !

  • Welcome Mike Anyayahan ! Thanks for joining us! When you get a chance, please tell us about yourself and your background in Epicurean philosophy.


    It would be particularly helpful if you could tell us (1) how you found this forum, and (2) how much background reading you have done in Epicurus. As an aid in the latter, we have prepared the following list of core reading.


    We look forward to talking with you!


    ----------------------- Epicurean Works I Have Read ---------------------------------


    1 The Biography of Epicurus By Diogenes Laertius (Chapter 10). This includes all Epicurus' letters and the Authorized Doctrines. Supplement with the Vatican list of Sayings.

    2 "Epicurus And His Philosophy" - Norman DeWitt

    3 "On The Nature of Things"- Lucretius

    4 Cicero's "On Ends" - Torquatus Section

    5 Cicero's "On The Nature of the Gods" - Velleius Section

    6 The Inscription of Diogenes of Oinoanda - Martin Ferguson Smith translation

    7 "A Few Days In Athens" - Frances Wright

    8 Lucian Core Texts on Epicurus: (1) Alexander the Oracle-Monger, (2) Hermotimus (3) Others?

    9 Plato's Philebus

    10 Philodemus "On Methods of Inference" (De Lacy version, including his appendix on relationship of Epicurean canon to Aristotle and other Greeks)

    11 "The Greeks on Pleasure" -Gosling & Taylor Sections on Epicurus, especially on katastematic and kinetic pleasure.

  • Cassius Thanks for a warm welcome. Let me introduce myself then.


    I'm Mike Anyayahan from the Philippines. I'm a freelance writer and a blogger. I studied Bachelor of Arts in Philosophy at Polytechnic University of the Philippines.


    I currently live in Iloilo City, just south of the Philippines. I'm married and a father of two lovely girls.


    My background in Epicurean philosophy is a product of my complex intellectual development from being a hard-line Marxist communist, to being a Socratic skeptic, then to becoming a Sartrean post-modern existentialist. I did not get into Epicureanism out of nothing. (Well, nothing comes out of nothing. :) ) It was my existentialist distaste of absolutism that led me to dig more on the question of free will.


    As a result, I re-evaluated all my ideological inclinations and questioned my own mode of thoughts. Along the way when I re-examined Marx's doctoral dissertation on Epicurus, I suddenly became curious about Epicurean philosophy.


    While studying Epicurus, I came across Stoicism and entertained the Stoic philosophy in my thoughts for a while. Then I found myself in a dialectic process between Epicureanism and Stoicism.


    But in the end, Epicurenism won my mind and my heart as I found Stoicism lacking in terms of authenticity (I do not say they are hypocrites ;)).


    I became a self-declared Epicurean just a month ago.


    So far, the Epicurean texts I have read are the Letter to Menoeceus, The Principal Doctrines, The Vatican Sayings, and the Book 1 of On Ends by Cicero. I am still in the process of reading Lucretius' On the Nature of Things.


    I am thankful you provided me a list of works to read. I have not yet read some of them so the above list is truly of great help.


    I found the group Epicurean philosophy because it appeared on the sidebar of my FB news feed as suggested group. Perhaps, the algorithm has recognized me as Epicurean based on my posts. Through this, we met, and I became a member here. It's my pleasure to be here.


    I m looking forward to becoming Epicurean friends with you guys. Thanks a lot. :)

    "It is not the pretended but the real pursuit of philosophy that is needed; for we do not need the appearance of good health but to enjoy it in truth."

  • Mike as you may have seen elsewhere in my comments i highly recommend the big-picture take on Epicurus found in Norma DeWitt's book "Epicurus and His Philosophy." You will not have any problem seeing the difference in his approach once you start reading it, and that book better than any other I am aware of will help with the "can't see the forest for the trees" problem.


    In the end you almost certainly will not agree with every one of DeWitt's conclusions, but he does more than most books to give you a full picture, which then makes it much easier to see how the parts fit together. I continue to think it is very difficult to dive into any of the specific works, especially Lucretius, without a high-level map of how thinks come together as a consistent whole.


    But enough of that for now -- welcome to the forum!

  • Cassius Thanks. I'll take note on that. There's no problem with me reading secondary literature along with original works. I am an open-minded person. :)

    "It is not the pretended but the real pursuit of philosophy that is needed; for we do not need the appearance of good health but to enjoy it in truth."

  • Surely in the ancient world the Epicureans also provided higher-level summaries for themselves, even before Diogenes Laertius did. And of course that is pretty much what the letters of Epicurus and the lists of doctrines were supposed to do. But I find that most people I talk to today are so distant from the Epicurean perspective that they have a hard time putting it together. Not necessarily applying to you personally, however, given all the reading you have done. But that makes your reaction to DeWitt of special interest to me, because I feel sure you will find his "take" quite different.

  • Cassius Yes. That makes me more curious about the book.

    "It is not the pretended but the real pursuit of philosophy that is needed; for we do not need the appearance of good health but to enjoy it in truth."

  • Welcome here, too, Mike!

    Martin Thanks a lot my friend. I'm looking forward to some more pleasant chats with you guys. :)

    "It is not the pretended but the real pursuit of philosophy that is needed; for we do not need the appearance of good health but to enjoy it in truth."