PD40

  • "As many as possess the power to procure complete immunity from their neighbours, these also live most pleasantly with one another, since they have the most certain pledge of security, and, after they have enjoyed the fullest intimacy, they do not lament the previous departure of a dead friend, as though he were to be pitied." Epicurus PD40 (Bailey)

    **ΟΣΟΙ TΗΝ ΔΥΝAΜΙΝ ****EΣΧΟΝ TΟΥ TΟ ΘAΡΡEΙΝ ΜAΛΙΣTA ****EΚ**

    **TΩΝ ΟΜΟΡΡΟΥΝTΩΝ ΠAΡAΣΚEΥAΣAΣΘAΙ ****ΟΥTΟΙ ΚAΙ**

    **EΒΙΩΣAΝ ****ΜET' AΛΛΗΛΩΝ ΗΔΙΣTA ****TΟ ΒEΒAΙΟTATΟΝ**

    **ΠΙΣTΩΜA EΧΟΝTEΣ ****ΚAΙ ΠΛΗΡEΣTATΗΝ ΟΙΚEΙΟTΗTA**

    **AΠΟΛAΒΟΝTEΣ ****ΟΥΚ ΩΔΥΡAΝTΟ ****ΩΣ ΠΡΟΣ EΛEΟΝ ****TΗΝ TΟΥ**

    **TEΛEΥTΗΣAΝTΟΣ ΠΡΟΚATAΣTΡΟΦΗΝ. **


    “The happiest men are they who have arrived at the point of having nothing to fear from those who surround them. Such men live with one another most agreeably, having the firmest grounds of confidence in one another, enjoying the advantages of friendship in all their fullness, and not lamenting as a pitiable circumstance, the premature death of their friends.” Yonge (1853)


    “Those who could best insure the confidence that they would be safe from their neighbours, being thus in possession of the surest guarantee, passed the most agreeable life in each other's society, and their enjoyment of the fullest intimacy was such that, if one of them died before his time, the survivors did not lament his death as if it called for pity.” Hicks (1910)


    “Those who were best able to provide themselves with the means of security against their neighbours, being thus in possession of the surest guarantee, passed the most agreeable life in each other's society; and their enjoyment of the fullest intimacy was such that, if one of them died before his time, the survivors did not lament his death as if it called for commiseration.” Hicks (1925)


    “As many as possess the power to procure complete immunity from their neighbours, these also live most pleasantly with one another, since they have the most certain pledge of security, and after they have enjoyed the fullest intimacy, they do not lament the previous departure of a dead friend, as though he were to be pitied.” Bailey (1926)


    “All those who have best succeeded in building up the ability to feel secure from the attacks of those around them have lived the happiest lives with one another, as having the firmest faith.” DeWitt, Epicurus and His Philosophy 304 (1954)


    “Those who were best able to prepare security for themselves in relation to their neighbors lived most pleasantly with their neighbors since they had the most perfect assurance; and enjoying the most complete intimacy, they did not lament the death of one who died before his time as if it were an occasion for sorrow.” Geer (1964)


    “Those who had the power to eliminate all fear of their neighbours lived together accordingly in the most pleasurable way, through having the firmest pledge of security, and after enjoying the fullest intimacy, they did not grieve over someone's untimely death as if it called for commiseration.” Long, The Hellenistic Philosophers 126 (1987)


    “Those who possess the power of securing themselves completely from their neighbors, live most happily with one another, since they have this constant assurance.


    And after partaking of the fullest intimacy, they do not mourn a friend who dies before they do, as though they were need for pity.” O'Connor (1993)


    “All those who had the power to acquire the greatest confidence from [the threats posed by] their neighbours also thereby lived together most pleasantly with the surest guarantee; and since they enjoyed the fullest sense of belonging they did not grieve the early death of the departed, as though it called for pity.” Inwood & Gerson (1994)


    “The happiest men are those who enjoy the condition of having nothing to fear from those who surround them. Such men live among one another most agreeably, having the firmest grounds for confidence in one another, enjoying the benefits of friendship in all their fullness, and they do not mourn a friend who dies before they do, as if there was a need for pity.” Anderson (2004)


    “Those who had the greatest ability to prepare defenses against their neighbors, so they could face up to them, were the ones who lived with each most pleasantly—since they had the most certain guarantee [that they were in no danger in any respect.] And, given that they had once enjoyed the most complete intimacy, they would not lament or cry for mercy if one suffered a premature demise.” Makridis (2005)


    “All those who have the power to obtain the greatest confidence from their neighbors also live with each other most enjoyably in the most steadfast trust; and experiencing the strongest fellowship they do not lament as pitiful the untimely end of those who pass away.” Saint-Andre (2008)


    “All who have the capacity to gain security, especially from those who live around them, live a most agreeable life together, since they have the firm assurance of friendship; and after enjoying their comradeship to the full they do not bewail the early demise of a departed friend as if it were a pitiable thing.” Strodach (2012)


    “All who could best obtain security against their neighbors, and thereby possessed the surest guarantee, lived most pleasantly with one another; and since they enjoyed the fullest intimacy they did not lament, as something to be pitied, the death of a member of their circle who predeceased them.” Mensch (2018)


    “All who acquired the ability to provide themselves the most reliable confidence in their neighbors thereby lived together most pleasantly, most secure in [their] mutual trust, and by forming the closest affiliation they never mourned in sorrow over anyone's untimely demise.” White (2021)

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