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  • Godfrey

    Replied to the thread Feedback From A User.
    Post
    Note: this may serve as an example of what can happen when fragments of the ancient scrolls are cited and the context isn't clear. What may be intended as humor instead becomes a redefinition or repudiation.
  • Godfrey

    Replied to the thread Feedback From A User.
    Post
    (Quote)

    I've not read the entire dialogue, so I'm speaking out of context. With that in mind, this quote does sound very Platonic, also maybe utilitarian. The response that comes to mind is to read PDs 5, 8, 10, 17, 20, 22, 25, 26, 29 and 30 regarding…
  • Godfrey

    Post
    Google Podcasts is a free Android app that is downloaded from the Google Play Store. It used to be part of Google Play Music, but some time ago it was split off on its own. That's what I use to listen to podcasts on my phone and I've been happy with it.…
  • Cassius

    Replied to the thread Feedback From A User.
    Post
    (Quote from Lee)

    Further, I would probably agree with Barwis that the answer to this question is "No" if we are talking "pain = evil" and "pleasure = good." Just as Barwis said, "that must depend upon the signification we give to the word good" and…
  • Cassius

    Replied to the thread Feedback From A User.
    Post
    Excellent question Lee. No, certainly not fully consistent, but I think if you re-read from the beginning of the dialog, and especially if you were to read the "Three Dialogues on Liberty" that are similar in form, you would conclude as I do that…
  • Cassius

    Post
    Thanks Godfrey, I have not heard of that. Is that a phone OS program? I think the key is getting the podcast listed in the main central providers, and that is what I need to investigate next.

    In the meantime I am pleased to say that we have Episode 2…
  • Lee

    Replied to the thread Feedback From A User.
    Post
    Cassius,

    I read chapter 15 of A Few Days in Athens and it his whet my appetite for the rest of the work. It is impressive that Frances Wright composed such an insightful book at the age of 18!

    I also enjoyed listening to the Jackson Barwis Dialogues
  • Godfrey

    Post
    My preferred podcast app is Google Podcasts for what it's worth....
  • Yes I am thinking there is a root concept of will/wish/desire that probably is at the core, which is why "desire" and "pleasure" seem so interchangeable even today in many contexts
  • Lee

    Replied to the thread Welcome JLR / Lee!.
    Post
    Still signed in...but now as Lee. Thanks Cassius!
  • You know, after I posted that this morning Cassius I got to think about the similarity between voluptas and voluntas ("wish" or "desire").
  • Cassius

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    Amen! Anesthesia is not "therapy" at all. It is dumbing and numbing yourself down to destruction.

    And all for what? For "VIRTUE"!
  • Mike Anyayahan

    Post
    (Quote from Cassius)

    The problem with their notion of therapy is that they want people to become numb with the reality. It's a total suppression of sensation.
  • Cassius

    Thread
    EDIT FROM CASSIUS: Because we did not get to this paragraph during Episode Two, I am pasting the text to be discussed in Episode three here, to be followed by the comments relevant to this paragraph that have already been posted. Charles' post follows
  • Martin

    Replied to the thread Welcome A_Gardner!.
    Post
    Welcome A_Gardener!
  • i think it would be interesting to dive into the latin etymology of "voluptas." The core seems to be related to "desire" of some kind, does it not, rather that strictly "pleasure"? I need a better online reference for the Latin because most of the…
  • That's an excellent note on "voluptuousness". The Latin for pleasure used by Lucretius is "voluptas".
  • Cassius

    Replied to the thread Welcome JLR / Lee!.
    Post
    JLR I just saw your comments about changing your user name - i have changed it for you to Lee. i hope this does not cause you any issues in signing in. if it does please email me - Cassius@epicureanfriends.com
  • Cassius

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    i am perfectly prepared to grant that words can be used in special ways and that we shouldn't rush to judgment. Epicurus clearly used special meanings for words like "gods" which have to be taken into account.

    But the accumulated thrust of stoicism is…
  • (Quote from Charles)

    Wow there is a lot of good stuff already Charles. However i hope he did not go too far in the direction quoted here because "let's be all body, ignoring our souls" sounds to me to be further than Epicurus would have stated it. It…
  • Cassius

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    Thank you Trey I had forgotten about that one! As soon as I get a couple of "Lucretius Today" podcasts put together i am going to revamp the delivery system and make sure that it is findable by podcast apps like you are talking about. Thanks for…
  • Mike Anyayahan

    Post
    (Quote from Charles)

    That's also what I told them, but they replied to me that they do not claim to be indifferent. They said that it is the surrounding that is indifferent, and they only have control of their mind whether to affirm an indifferent object…
  • Charles

    Post
    Mike Anyayahan
    The indifference of Stoicism has a hard time keeping up with the Swerve of Epicurean Philosophy :)
  • Oh, and something to bear in mind when reading about Mettrie, he used the words "pleasure" and "voluptuousness" in the exact same regards, sometimes using both in the same sentence. Kirk Watson also denotes that "voluptuousness" can be translated as…
  • Here's the opening statement to Anti-Seneca, its quite wordy but already so pleasing and promising.

    "The Philosophers have come to no more agreement about happiness than about anything else. Some of them see it in the dirtiest and most brazen deeds;…
  • Mike Anyayahan

    Post
    (Quote from Cassius)

    When I used to be active in one FB Stoicism group, I noticed that even stoics there are divided in this issue. Some are gloomy. Others are joyful amidst pain especially for those who incorporate stoicism into cognitive behavioral…
  • Charles

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    I came across "Ίφιάνασσα" or "Iphianassa" in "Ancient Greek", which means "strong queen".

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…sa_(daughter_of_Agamemnon)

    Maybe this sheds some light on it?
  • JJElbert

    Post
    Update:


    The use of Iphianassa for Iphigenia was not related to meter, as the two names rendered in Latin are metrically equivalent. The mystery remains!
  • treyh32

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    I found your soundcloud podcast and thought that your introduction was incredibly well done, you really need to have this on the apple podcast app as I feel like it is lacking the attention that it truly deserves on soundcloud because it is not a common…
  • Lee

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    Nice work Cassius! I just finished episode 1 and look forward to listening to episode 2.

    I understand the need to keep some order over the discussion- especially when recording for broadcast. Just keep me in mind in more participants are required.…

Recent Articles From Our EpicureanFriends Blogs

    Inspired by the considerations on the Epicurean friendship of Phillp Mithis in the book "The Ethical Theory of Epicurus - The pleasures of Invulnerability," I want to summarize the thought of Epicurus on friendship, trying to use his own words as much as possible, and adding mine where necessary. I am indebted to Carlo Diano because his thematic collection of Epicurus's maxims was essential. The first Epicurean festival, whose general theme was about friendship, was also very useful.

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    [Cassius: I write the following article clearly stating that it is my own personal opinion, without representation that it is or should be "the Epicurean position." I do not believe that I or anyone else has the ability to say what political positions every person applying Epicurean principles will take, and indeed that is the point of this article. I am writing this mainly to those of us who consider ourselves to be actively promoting Epicurean philosophy. I believe strongly that everyone,

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    JC:


    Hi Cassius. I'm sorry to badger you about this again, but I'm still trying to get my head around the pleasure principle. From my reading, all scholars agree that Epicurus divides pleasure into kinetic and katastematic. Am I right in thinking mainline scholars think Epicurus prized the latter over the former, and that DeWitt didn't? I ask because although mainline scholars I've read equate pleasure with tranquility / absence of pain, they nonetheless encourage the pursuit of positive

    Read More