Intuitive Eating

  • I just saw a piece on the CBS Mornings show about "intuitive eating" that struck me as a very Epicurean way of looking at food.

    Here's the site

    10 Principles of Intuitive Eating - Intuitive Eating
    10 Principles of Intuitve Eating
    www.intuitiveeating.org

    This line was interesting: "The Japanese have the wisdom to keep pleasure as one of their goals of healthy living."

    Uh, hello?

    I'm sure the video from the show will be up soon

    CBS Mornings
    Each weekday morning, "CBS Mornings” co-hosts Gayle King, Tony Dokoupil and Nate Burleson bring you the latest breaking news, smart conversation and in-depth…
    youtube.com

  • I read somewhere on this forum that the beauty of Epicureanism is that it's simply an observation of the world; and I don't think one has to be a monk in order to grasp the truth in this article. Still, I wouldn't call it inherently Epicurean- many religions and philosophies have rituals and traditions regarding meals. I regard eating your food consciously and with great joy as inherently natural, something which bring us more pleasure in the end. Epicureanism has simply succeeded in noticing natural patterns, in contrast to the other religions out there. Still, thanks for sharing!

  • Still, I wouldn't call it inherently Epicurean- many religions and philosophies have rituals and traditions regarding meals. I regard eating your food consciously and with great joy as inherently natural, something which bring us more pleasure in the end. Epicureanism has simply succeeded in noticing natural patterns, in contrast to the other religions out there. Still, thanks for sharing!

    I think this is exactly right and a huge point. It is good to have this article for reference because we constantly need reinforcement in living prudently toward a happy life.


    But it's also true at the same time that even though Epicurus would maintain that his philosophy is largely just "common sense" applied to observation of nature, that doesn't mean that every activity implementing "common sense" should be claimed to be "Epicurean."


    That would almost be what we sense (rightly or wrong) to have been DeWitt's attitude toward Christianity, on steroids -- every observation of commonality between Christianity and Epicurus becomes "aha - there was crosspolination!" And every observation of people having a good time means that they are Epicurean! ;)


    It would clearly be wrong to overgeneralize like that, but it would also be wrong to throw up a barrier and say "We will discuss nothing on this forum but the most abstract of philosophy!" ;) (I know some people probably think that already! )


    So that's what we use separate forums and subforums on the site to do -- put things in their proper place where they can be found at the appropriate times.


    We are not disembodied minds, nor do we want to be, so we need to experience all sides of life, and I think we will find that we likely have similar approaches to a wide variety of things - even food and other day to day matters.

  • I feel I should provide a little more context and rationale for my post in light of your comments.

    I regard eating your food consciously and with great joy as inherently natural, something which bring us more pleasure in the end

    Exactly.

    Still, I wouldn't call it inherently Epicurean

    I completely agree; however, I think it's completely in line with Epicurean philosophy. (see below for more)

    That would almost be what we sense (rightly or wrong) to have been DeWitt's attitude toward Christianity, on steroids -- every observation of commonality between Christianity and Epicurus becomes "aha - there was crosspolination!" And every observation of people having a good time means that they are Epicurean!

    Oh, Cassius knows I'll respond to this ;)

    But seriously, I *fully* concur there is no "cross-pollination" or influence or connection (from the researchers/dieticians here) in any way with Epicurean philosophy. I am not (at least in my mind) seeing Epicurean appropriation around every corner.

    However, I think their descriptions falls well within an Epicurean tradition or practice unbeknownst to them. Their emphasis on paying attention to your body's cues, your feelings of pleasure and pain, your own interoception is exactly what an Epicurean could/would do.

    To respond to smoothiekiwi , I think it is actually inherently Epicurean without being directly connected to Epicureanism per se.

    There are no "rituals" or "traditions" involved in this suggested way of approaching eating. Simply listening to your body's natural innate cues. Epicureans need to pay attention to their feelings of pleasure and pain, and this "intuitive eating" is saying exactly that.

    Now, all this being said, this isn't a hill I'm willing to die on... But I think this approach *is* Epicurean in the broad sense. I do not want to go down the syncretism path, but I don't think this particular approach to a healthy attitude toward food (in this time of general abundance and easy access to junk/fast food) is a bad idea, and its general coincidence to being aligned to Epicurean principles was striking from my perspective.