Hide and Seek in the Garden of Epicurus, Leontium and Ternissa by William Stott (1800s)

Original Image: Hide and Seek in the Garden of Epicurus, Leontium and Ternissa by William Stott (1857-1900)

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“The Garden was surprisingly egalitarian, letting in women and people of all social classes.” (Epicureanism, 5)


“Epicurus thinks that all people, young and old, need correct philosophy to produce psychic health and happiness (Ep. Men. 122), and Epicurus was notably egalitarian in admitting women and slaves to his school”. (Epicureanism, 136)


“…this particular trait was traditional with Epicureans, who from the first admitted women to the study of their philosophy… (St. Paul and Epicurus, 135)


“Epicureanism, one of two ancient philosophical systems which advocated the emancipation of women […] The members of the Garden included not only full Athenian citizens like Epicurus himself but also several women and slaves, who, within the context of Athenian society at large, enjoyed few legal rights or privileges (The Women and the Lyre: Women Writers in Classical Greece and Rome, 61)