You Can't Always Want What You Like (podcast episode)

  • https://www.happinesslab.fm/season-3/episode-5-you-cant-always-want-what-you-like


    At the risk of becoming the podcast reviewer here on the forum, here's another podcast suggestion. It's also from Dr Laurie Santos on her own podcast, The Happiness Lab.

    This one seemed to me to directly address the Epicurean practice of choice and avoidance. Around 5:55, they talk specifically about choosing to experience pain in the pursuit of pleasure ("chosen suffering" at 7:15). It also talks about the myths associated with dopamine. According to current research, dopamine is not the "pleasure" neurotransmitter, it's involved in "wanting." They also talk about Mihaly Csikszentmihalyi's concept of flow. I'm wondering if "flow" has parallels with ataraxia or eudaimonia.

    Another reason I've been posting these is to find examples of popular podcasts to see what they're doing: what's their format like, what their production is like, etc, to see if there is anything we might learn for efforts here.

    Enjoy (fast forward through the commercials!).

  • Another reason, I realize, is to share what appears to me to be the widespread presence of Epicurean principles and practices in positive psychology and neurobiology research. They're not identified as such, but I continue to see parallels, echoes, and reflections of those ancient philosophical teachings throughout these podcasts, articles, and papers.

  • Since this is a recurring source of good topics, let's think about a category for them rather than General Discussion. I will look too and if needed we will set up a new one, but I think we have a section perhaps on videos that is close.

  • Funny thing, Don ... I was listening to this podcast earlier this morning while driving and thought that it might be worth posting. Of course my second thought was "I wonder if Don has posted this?"


    To me, this episode is relevant to all of the PDs concerning pleasure and desire. I also think that it's helpful as an Epicurean to understand the differences between pleasures and desires, and getting some grasp of modern neuroscience is relevant in that regard.

  • Funny thing, Don ... I was listening to this podcast earlier this morning while driving and thought that it might be worth posting. Of course my second thought was "I wonder if Don has posted this?"

    LOL! We definitely seem to be leading parallel lives around here, Godfrey :)

    And I agree with your conclusions, too!