[Historical Records] from The Epicurean Philosophy Facebook Group

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    Welcome to This Week in Epicurean Philosophy for the week of 10/10/15! To subscribe (at no cost) click here.
    This is the one hundred and twenty-seventh in a series of weekly reports on news from the world of Epicurean Philosophy. At the Epicurean Philosophy Group we are dedicated to the study and productive discussion of Epicurean Philosophy and its application to daily life. Our goal is also, in the words of Lucian, to "strike a blow for Epicurus - that great man whose holiness and divinity of nature were not shams, who alone had and imparted true insight into the good, and who brought deliverance to all that consorted with him!"
    This week: more on how we console ourselves to the death of loved ones.
    Last week we marked the death of Erik Anderson, founder of the Epicurus.info website, as recorded in his obituary. This week, I am still caught up in thinking about how short life is, and how important it is for us to make the best use of the time that we have. As I also mentioned last week in discussing Erik's death, a very close friend of my own died last week. This past week has been spent meeting with his widow and hearing about my friend's final months struggling with a heart condition that should have been curable, and that has kept the issue of reconciling with death front and center in my mind.
    There are many ancient Epicurean passages that deal with the loss of a loved one to death, but a longer passage that stands out was written in the 1800's by Frances Wright and given to Epicurus to say in chapter ten of A Few Days In Athens stands out. If you haven't yet read A Few Days In Athens, I hope this extended quote will encourage you to take the plunge:
    "But there is yet a pain, which the wisest and the best of men cannot escape; that all of us, my sons, have felt, or have to feel. Do not your hearts whisper it? Do you not tell me, that in death there is yet a sting? That ere he aim at us, he may level the beloved of our soul? The father, whose tender care hath reared our infant minds — the brother, whom the same breast hath nourished, and the same roof sheltered, with whom, side by side, we have grown like two plants by a river, sucking life from the same fountain and strength from the same sun — the child whose gay prattle delights our ears, or whose opening understanding fixes our hopes — the friend of our choice, with whom we have exchanged hearts, and shared all our pains and pleasures, whose eye hath reflected the tear of sympathy, whose hand hath smoothed the couch of sickness. Ah! my sons, here indeed is a pain — a pain that cuts into the soul. There are masters that will tell you otherwise; who will tell you that it is unworthy of a man to mourn even here. But such, my sons, speak not the truth of experience or philosophy, but the subtleties of sophistry and pride. He who feels not the loss, hath never felt the possession. He who knows not the grief, hath never known the joy. See the price of a friend in the duties we render him, and the sacrifices we make to him, and which, in making, we count not sacrifices, but pleasures. We sorrow for his sorrow; we supply his wants, or, if we cannot, we share them. We follow him to exile. We close ourselves in his prison; we soothe him in sickness; we strengthen him in death: nay, if it be possible, we throw down our life for his. Oh! What a treasure is that for which we do so much! And is it forbidden to us to mourn its loss? If it be, the power is not with us to obey.
    Should we, then, to avoid the evil, forego the good? Shall we shut love from our hearts, that we may not feel the pain of his departure? No; happiness forbids it. Experience forbids it. Let him who hath laid on the pyre the dearest of his soul, who hath washed the urn with the bitterest tears of grief — let him say if his heart hath ever formed the wish that it had never shrined within it him whom he now deplores. Let him say if the pleasures of the sweet communion of his former days doth not still live in his remembrance. If he love not to recall the image of the departed, the tones of his voice, the words of his discourse, the deeds of his kindness, the amiable virtues of his life. If, while he weeps the loss of his friend, he smiles not to think that he once possessed him. He who knows not friendship, knows not the purest pleasure of earth. Yet if fate deprive us of it, though we grieve, we do not sink; Philosophy is still at hand, and she upholds us with fortitude. And think, my sons, perhaps in the very evil we dread, there is a good; perhaps the very uncertainty of the tenure gives it value in our eyes; perhaps all our pleasures take their zest from the known possibility of their interruption. What were the glories of the sun, if we knew not the gloom of darkness? What the refreshing breezes of morning and evening, if we felt not the fervors of noon? Should we value the lovely-flower, if it bloomed eternally; or the luscious fruit, if it hung always on the bough? Are not the smiles of the heavens more beautiful in contrast with their frowns, and the delights of the seasons more grateful from their vicissitudes? Let us then be slow to blame nature, for perhaps in her apparent errors there is hidden a wisdom. Let us not quarrel with fate, for perhaps in our evils lie the seeds of our good. Were our body never subject to sickness, we might be insensible to the joy of health. Were our life eternal, our tranquillity might sink into inaction. Were our friendship not threatened with interruption, it might want much of its tenderness. This, then, my sons, is our duty, for this is our interest and our happiness; to seek our pleasures from the hands of the virtues, and for the pain which may befall us, to submit to it with patience, or bear up against it with fortitude. To walk, in short, through life innocently and tranquilly; and to look on death as its gentle termination, which it becomes us to meet with ready minds, neither regretting the past, nor anxious for the future.”
    From the Facebook Group this week:
    This past week Hiram posted a link to a great collection of Epicurean "memes" and pamphlets which can be used to share information about Epicurus in graphic form. One of the materials listed there is a PDF ofNorman DeWitt's Philosophy for the Millions, an excellent introduction to the significance of Epicurus and his philosophy.
    Uwe F. posted a link to an interesting article on Lucretius' choice of style for persuasion.
    Hiram also posted a link to an upcoming release by Michael Onfrey entitled "A Hedonist Manifesto: The Power to Exist." This is the English translation of a book that was published in French a number of years ago, and it's right on target with many isssues of interest to the student of Epicurus. From the Amazon page: "Onfray attacks Platonic idealism and its manifestation in Judaic, Christian, and Islamic belief. He warns of the lure of attachment to the purportedly eternal, immutable truths of idealism, which detracts from the immediacy of the world and our bodily existence. Insisting that philosophy is a practice that operates in a real, material space, Onfray enlists Epicurus and Democritus to undermine idealist and theological metaphysics; Nietzsche, Bentham, and Mill to dismantle idealist ethics; and Palante and Bourdieu to collapse crypto-fascist neoliberalism. In their place, he constructs a positive, hedonistic ethics that enlarges on the work of the New Atheists to promote a joyful approach to our lives in this, our only, world."
    Hiram also posted a link to a very good video on Richard Dawkins on how we should deal with assertions by religion which by nature cannot be proved. Dawkins emphasizes that relativism is not a sufficient response to religion, a point of view we often hear expressed as "everyone is entitled to their own opinion, but not their own facts.

    Recent significant posts at NewEpicurean.com:

    “Quantity” Does Not Equal “Type”The diagram associated with this post is intended to dramatize the question: Does any quantity of a thing ever change that thing into its opposite? When Epicurus stated that there…
    Peace and Safety For Your Twentieth of September! – An Overview of the Letter to HerodotusPeace and Safety to the Epicureans of today, no matter where you might be! This month for the Twentieth, I offer a quick outline of the major points of…
    Fundamentals of Epicurean Philosophy – An Outline(Click on the bullet to the left of each item to expand.) This outline represents my latest aid to discussing Epicurus with people who are new to the philosophy. I can't…
    All Dressed Up But No Place To GoThanks to Alexander R. for linking to this video at the Science Channel, which alleges that the robot in this example is well on its way to learning emotional associations.…
    A Season Of The Year To Remember Fallen EpicureansChecking back over the last four years, it seems that late in August of odd-numbered years I have resubmitted the following post on "A Season of the Year To Remember Fallen…


    Thanks to all who participated in the Facebook forum this week. As always, if you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please add a comment or participate in the Epicurean Philosophy Facebook Group!
    - - - Live Well!
    = = = = = NOTES = = = = =
    Resources for Epicurean Philosophy On The Internet




    There are many find Epicurean websites on the internet, so be sure you are aware of the main ones. This newsletter is brought to you by www.NewEpicurean.com. Two other very active and important websites are SocietyofEpicurus.com and Menoeceus.blogspot.com
    There is also an active website in Greece (mostly in the Greek language) at Epicuros.net. Please be sure to check the list at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for a full list, and let us know if other sites should be mentioned here.
    Options for those who wish to discuss Epicurus on the internet include:1- If you are focused primarily on Epicurus, and you want to participate in a forum where people will defend Epicurus strongly from all challenges, then you have two Facebook options. Our open and main group, entitled simply "Epicurean Philosophy," is the home base of this post. Anyone can read the posts there, and all you have to do is ask in order to join. (Note that there is an "About" and a "Sticky" post with our forum rules.)
    2 - If you are someone whose views are fully formed, and you've combined several disparate viewpoints into your own personal mix, and you mainly want to talk casually to other people of the same eclectic type, there are several excellent facebook groups including EPISTOBUZEN and "Epicureanism for Modern Times." 3 - If you prefer to post in a "private" group where your posts are not readable by outsiders, we have "Epicurean Private Garden." Because it is a private group, you cannot find it by searching, and you have to email one of our admins in the open group if you wish to join. Please note that our About and Sticky Post rules in the private forum are the same as the open forum, and the private forum will be moderated to the same standards as the open forum (or perhaps slightly tighter!)
    4 - If you are not only focused primarily on Epicurus, but you wish to assist with a forum platform where pro-Epicurean activists can build for the future, check out www.EpicureanFriends.com. Work is starting on a FAQ and other resources. Anyone can read the posts, but only approved members can create new posts or comment.
    5 - If your interest is primarily on the scientific research side, such as implications of quantum mechanics and related theories, be sure to check out "Epicurean Touchpoints" at Facebook.
    Please be sure to check out the list of websites at www.EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for the latest available sites. If you know of sites that should be mentioned here, please send me an email.
    This email newsletter is brought to you by NewEpicurean.com. Copies of these posts, and a current list of links to active Epicurean websites can also be found at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.com.



    To change your subscription, click here.

  • View this newsletter online.
    Welcome to This Week in Epicurean Philosophy for the week of 10/17/15! To subscribe (at no cost) click here.
    This is the one hundred and twenty-eighth in a series of weekly reports on news from the world of Epicurean Philosophy. At the Epicurean Philosophy Group we are dedicated to the study and productive discussion of Epicurean Philosophy and its application to daily life. Our goal is also, in the words of Lucian, to "strike a blow for Epicurus - that great man whose holiness and divinity of nature were not shams, who alone had and imparted true insight into the good, and who brought deliverance to all that consorted with him!"
    Note Re: Epicurus.info and the Epicurus wiki.
    Over the last two weeks we've mentioned the death of Erik Anderson, founder of the Epicurus.info website and the associated wiki, two of the most helpful Epicurean sites on the internet. As of this writing those sites are still offline, but they can be accessed at https://web.archive.org/web/20141217100328/http://epicurus.info/and https://web.archive.org/web/20…i.epicurus.info/Main_Page .
    This Week: Applying Epicurus To Modern Problems.
    Before we can apply Epicurus to our own lives, we first have to understand his advice, and that is not always as easy as it first appears. We all know that Epicurus considered pleasure to be the guide of life, but just as in any other philosophy (or in any religion) there are plenty of questions about how that should be done. We often run into situations where there are competing demands and priorities, and we need to know how to approach those situations where the evidence for what we should do is conflicting.
    That's the reason for the recent post entitled "The Epicurean Method of Analogy in Philodemus, and its Vital Importance to Us." Epicurus didn't just pick an unconventional goal of life at random, he claimed that the goal of life, and the method for living it properly, all derive from the nature of the universe. The atomistic view of the universe that Epicurus taught led him to stress that thinking itself is a function of the atoms, and must operate consistently with the elements if it is to be successful.
    Thus by the time Herculaneum as destroyed and the Epicurean library was buried in the debris, Philodemus had produced a work highlighting the differences between Epicurean methods of thinking and those of other schools. The part of the work that survived has been translated by Phillip and Estelle De Lacy, and the result, with an excellent commentary, is easily accessible at the link featured in the article.
    Only one small part of Philodemus' work is featured in the recent blog post, and there is much more to be learned from Philodemus' argument. But the bottom line is that successful rational thinking is not reserved for the gods, or for the experts in syllogistic logic. It is essential for happy living that we have confidence in the results of our thinking, and that's exactly what we can achieve if base our thinking on the evidence nature gives to us, and not on the opinions of other men.
    Also From the Facebook Group this week:
    This past week at the Epicurean Philosophy Group contained a post onthe hypothetical content of modern ceremonies for important life events based on Epicurean principles.
    Also, in the most-diiscussed post of the week, Jason B. posted about how modern psychological problems might be addressed using Epicurean principles.

    Recent significant posts at NewEpicurean.com:

    “Quantity” Does Not Equal “Type”The diagram associated with this post is intended to dramatize the question: Does any quantity of a thing ever change that thing into its opposite? When Epicurus stated that there…
    Peace and Safety For Your Twentieth of September! – An Overview of the Letter to HerodotusPeace and Safety to the Epicureans of today, no matter where you might be! This month for the Twentieth, I offer a quick outline of the major points of…
    Fundamentals of Epicurean Philosophy – An Outline(Click on the bullet to the left of each item to expand.) This outline represents my latest aid to discussing Epicurus with people who are new to the philosophy. I can't…
    All Dressed Up But No Place To GoThanks to Alexander R. for linking to this video at the Science Channel, which alleges that the robot in this example is well on its way to learning emotional associations.…
    A Season Of The Year To Remember Fallen EpicureansChecking back over the last four years, it seems that late in August of odd-numbered years I have resubmitted the following post on "A Season of the Year To Remember Fallen…


    Thanks to all who participated in the Facebook forum this week. As always, if you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please add a comment or participate in the Epicurean Philosophy Facebook Group!
    - - - Live Well!
    = = = = = NOTES = = = = =
    Resources for Epicurean Philosophy On The Internet




    There are many find Epicurean websites on the internet, so be sure you are aware of the main ones. This newsletter is brought to you by www.NewEpicurean.com. Two other very active and important websites are SocietyofEpicurus.com and Menoeceus.blogspot.com
    There is also an active website in Greece (mostly in the Greek language) at Epicuros.net. Please be sure to check the list at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for a full list, and let us know if other sites should be mentioned here.
    Options for those who wish to discuss Epicurus on the internet include:1- If you are focused primarily on Epicurus, and you want to participate in a forum where people will defend Epicurus strongly from all challenges, then you have two Facebook options. Our open and main group, entitled simply "Epicurean Philosophy," is the home base of this post. Anyone can read the posts there, and all you have to do is ask in order to join. (Note that there is an "About" and a "Sticky" post with our forum rules.)
    2 - If you are someone whose views are fully formed, and you've combined several disparate viewpoints into your own personal mix, and you mainly want to talk casually to other people of the same eclectic type, there are several excellent facebook groups including EPISTOBUZEN and "Epicureanism for Modern Times." 3 - If you prefer to post in a "private" group where your posts are not readable by outsiders, we have "Epicurean Private Garden." Because it is a private group, you cannot find it by searching, and you have to email one of our admins in the open group if you wish to join. Please note that our About and Sticky Post rules in the private forum are the same as the open forum, and the private forum will be moderated to the same standards as the open forum (or perhaps slightly tighter!)
    4 - If you are not only focused primarily on Epicurus, but you wish to assist with a forum platform where pro-Epicurean activists can build for the future, check out www.EpicureanFriends.com. Work is starting on a FAQ and other resources. Anyone can read the posts, but only approved members can create new posts or comment.
    5 - If your interest is primarily on the scientific research side, such as implications of quantum mechanics and related theories, be sure to check out "Epicurean Touchpoints" at Facebook.
    Please be sure to check out the list of websites at www.EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for the latest available sites. If you know of sites that should be mentioned here, please send me an email.
    This email newsletter is brought to you by NewEpicurean.com. Copies of these posts, and a current list of links to active Epicurean websites can also be found at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.com.



    To change your subscription, click here.

  • Welcome to This Week in Epicurean Philosophy for the week of 10/24/15! To subscribe (at no cost) click here.
    This is the one hundred and twenty-ninth in a series of weekly reports on news from the world of Epicurean Philosophy. At the Epicurean Philosophy Group we are dedicated to the study and productive discussion of Epicurean Philosophy and its application to daily life. Our goal is also, in the words of Lucian, to "strike a blow for Epicurus - that great man whose holiness and divinity of nature were not shams, who alone had and imparted true insight into the good, and who brought deliverance to all that consorted with him!"
    The History of Remembering Epicurus on "the Twentieth"
    This past week contained the twentieth of October, and one of our Facebook Group readers asked about the reasons for posting "Happy Twentieth. This is a question we receive often, so rather than simply list the link in this newsletter, let's cite the references, starting with the main one from the will of Epicurus:
    "And from the revenues made over by me to Amynomachus and Timocrates let them to the best of their power in consultation with Hermarchus make separate provision for the funeral offerings to my father, mother, and brothers, and for the customary celebration of my birthday on the tenth day of Gamelion in each year, and for the meeting of all my School held every month on the twentieth day to commemorate Metrodorus and myself according to the rules now in force. Let them also join in celebrating the day in Poseideon which commemorates my brothers, and likewise the day in Metageitnion which commemorates Polyaenus, as I have done previously."
    Norman DeWitt described the history this way in Epicurus and His Philosophy, Chapter 2:
    "At any rate, in the dispositions made long afterward in his will for the perpetuation of his own memory, the date was fixed, not for the anniversary day of his birth, which fell on the seventh, but at the twentieth, the day that marked the final initiations at Eleusis. The twentieth was also sacred to Apollo, which gave it an additional sanctity. Such notoriety eventually attached itself to these monthly memorial gatherings that Epicureans were dubbed "Twentyers" by way of derision."
    Further, there is record in the poetry of the Epicurean Philodemus that documents the tradition:
    Tomorrow, dearest Piso, your cultured companion drags you
    To his humble shack at three o'clock
    To feed you your annual dinner on the Twentieth. If you'll miss
    Sow's udders and Bromius' Chian wine,
    Still you'll see your faithful companions and hear
    Things far more sweet than the Phaeacians' land.
    And if you ever turn your gaze on us too, Piso,
    We'll have a richer Twentieth, instead of a humble one.
    In addition to the "happy twentieth" greetings you see in the Epicurean Philosophy Facebook group, Hiram Crespo has written an excellent article on how modern Epicureans might continue the tradition.
    Also From the Facebook Group this week:
    On 10/17 Alexander R. linked to an article on decision-making and quantum theory.


    On 10/18, I posted about Cicero's Tusculun Disputations, where Cicero had one of his character say a line to the effect that: "he would prefer to agree with Plato and be wrong than to agree with certain philosophers and be right." Norman DeWitt construes the philososphers referred to as Epicureans, but the line doesn't specifically refer to Epicurus, so the context has to be taken into account. The closest school referred to just before the particular reference is Pythagorean, but the context makes pretty clear that Plato was agreeing with the Pythagoreans that the soul survives death, so the Pythagoreans aren't the ones being contrasted to Plato. The entire thrust of passages before this, however, is an argument against those who assert that the soul perishes at death, so (and/or maybe Democritus) seems to be the leading candidate for that position.'
    Also on 10/18, Victor H. linked to an interesting article on the Hippocratic Oath.
    On 10/20 Steve K posted about the "Epicurean Manifesto."
    Also on 10/20 we had the complete exchange with George M. about the Twentieth.
    Hiram Crespo's "The Epicurean Revival" was posted about this time last year, and relinked this past week in our group.
    And finally on 10/20, George M.'s post led to a post about the "weak and beggarly elements."
    On 10/23 Uwe F. linked to an article on Lucretius and his persuasive abilities.
    Rounding out the week, Ilkka V. posted a new article to the Menoeceus blog, this one on the important topic of definitions in philosophical discussions.
    Recent significant posts at NewEpicurean.com:

    Peace and Safety For Your Twentieth of October – Tips on Epicurean Reasoning from PhilodemusPeace and Safety to the Epicureans of today, no matter where you might be! Every day, not just the Twentieth, is a good day to remember that Epicurean philosophy teaches a…
    The Epicurean “Method of Analogy” in Philodemus, And Its Vital Importance to UsWhat do we do when we are confronted by differences of opinion among people who believe very strongly in their ideals, even though those ideals vary tremendously from person to…
    “This Week In Epicurean Philosophy”For the last several years (one hundred and twenty five weeks, to be exact) I have been producing a short weekly summary of notable links and discussions on the Facebook…
    “Quantity” Does Not Equal “Type”The diagram associated with this post is intended to dramatize the question: Does any quantity of a thing ever change that thing into its opposite? When Epicurus stated that there…
    Peace and Safety For Your Twentieth of September! – An Overview of the Letter to HerodotusPeace and Safety to the Epicureans of today, no matter where you might be! This month for the Twentieth, I offer a quick outline of the major points of…


    Thanks to all who participated in the Facebook forum this week. As always, if you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please add a comment or participate in the Epicurean Philosophy Facebook Group!
    - - - Live Well!
    = = = = = NOTES = = = = =
    Resources for Epicurean Philosophy On The Internet




    There are many find Epicurean websites on the internet, so be sure you are aware of the main ones. This newsletter is brought to you by www.NewEpicurean.com. Two other very active and important websites are SocietyofEpicurus.com and Menoeceus.blogspot.com
    There is also an active website in Greece (mostly in the Greek language) at Epicuros.net. Please be sure to check the list at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for a full list, and let us know if other sites should be mentioned here.
    Options for those who wish to discuss Epicurus on the internet include:1- If you are focused primarily on Epicurus, and you want to participate in a forum where people will defend Epicurus strongly from all challenges, then you have two Facebook options. Our open and main group, entitled simply "Epicurean Philosophy," is the home base of this post. Anyone can read the posts there, and all you have to do is ask in order to join. (Note that there is an "About" and a "Sticky" post with our forum rules.)
    2 - If you are someone whose views are fully formed, and you've combined several disparate viewpoints into your own personal mix, and you mainly want to talk casually to other people of the same eclectic type, there are several excellent facebook groups including EPISTOBUZEN and "Epicureanism for Modern Times." 3 - If you prefer to post in a "private" group where your posts are not readable by outsiders, we have "Epicurean Private Garden." Because it is a private group, you cannot find it by searching, and you have to email one of our admins in the open group if you wish to join. Please note that our About and Sticky Post rules in the private forum are the same as the open forum, and the private forum will be moderated to the same standards as the open forum (or perhaps slightly tighter!)
    4 - If you are not only focused primarily on Epicurus, but you wish to assist with a forum platform where pro-Epicurean activists can build for the future, check out www.EpicureanFriends.com. Work is starting on a FAQ and other resources. Anyone can read the posts, but only approved members can create new posts or comment.
    5 - If your interest is primarily on the scientific research side, such as implications of quantum mechanics and related theories, be sure to check out "Epicurean Touchpoints" at Facebook.
    Please be sure to check out the list of websites at www.EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for the latest available sites. If you know of sites that should be mentioned here, please send me an email.
    This email newsletter is brought to you by NewEpicurean.com. Copies of these posts, and a current list of links to active Epicurean websites can also be found at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.com.


    This email newsletter is brought to you by NewEpicurean.com
    To change your subscription, click here.

  • View this email online
    Welcome to This Week in Epicurean Philosophy for the week of 10/31/15! To subscribe (at no cost) click here.
    This is the one hundred and thirtieth in a series of weekly reports on news from the world of Epicurean Philosophy. At the Epicurean Philosophy Group we are dedicated to the study and productive discussion of Epicurean Philosophy and its application to daily life. Our goal is also, in the words of Lucian, to "strike a blow for Epicurus - that great man whose holiness and divinity of nature were not shams, who alone had and imparted true insight into the good, and who brought deliverance to all that consorted with him!"
    Dawn of A New Age of Epicurus

    If you follow the world of politics, the last ten days in the USA have provided an important reminder: where passions run high, truth is often the first casualty. If you are of a liberal political persuasion, you have been outraged by the treatment of Hillary Clinton by the Republican Congress. If you are of conservative persuasion, you have been outraged by hostile reporters at the Republican presidential debate.
    No matter how badly you feel about the distortions and misrepresentations you have witnessed, stop for a moment and think. How would you feel about a similar campaign of deliberate distortion and misrepresentation that lasted, not ten days, but two thousand years? What if the target of those lies was not an ordinary politician, but the leading philosopher of Western Civilization, who had stood up heroically, and almost alone, against the forces of false religion and false philosophy which had kept the world before his time in darkness?
    If you can imagine the anger you you would feel, but if you also think that this obstacle would not intimidate you, but would spur you on to search out the truth with even more strength, then you are ready for the world of Epicurean philosophy.
    Almost all that is truly known about the philosophy of Epicurus is contained in Book X of the "Lives and Opinions of the Philosophers" written by Diogenes Laertius in ancient Greece, in the poem "On the Nature of Things" written by Lucretius in ancient Rome, and in the fragmented inscription dug up from the wallstones erected by Diogenes of Oinoanda in ancient Asia Minor. None of these works are so lengthy, or so difficult, that you cannot master them for yourself. With very few exceptions, these sources are the only documents left to us by the men who understood Epicurean philosophy, who supported it, and who intended to convey it with accuracy and fairness.
    But contrary to these reliable texts, a torrent of intentional misrepresentation and negligent error has been delivered for two thousand years. In every direction you look, whether in the ancient world by Cicero or Plutarch, or in the modern world by Wikipedia or the slickest websites, you will find commentary prepared by people who were (or are) avowed enemies of core Epicurean doctrines. These anti-Epicurean commentaries have had one purpose: to tear down, disrupt, and confuse those who would look to Epicurus for philosophic guidance.
    But the world is changing. Modern technology is allowing the scattered few who sense the truth about Epicurus to communicate easily with one another. Modern technology is allowing those who wish to learn the truth for themselves to find and share the hidden gems of analysis that still exist, rediscovered through digital scanning, and recovered from centuries of dormancy on the dusty shelves of libraries from around the world.
    In recent years the NewEpicurean.com has had a small role to play in encouraging the rediscovery of Epicurus, but the work has hardly begun. With the help of modern technology and internet collaboration, we've only begun to reconstitute a body of work that accurately conveys the true teachings of Epicurus for themselves. In other corners of the internet, such as the Facebook Epicurean Philosophy Group and Facebook Epicurus Page, the Society of Epicurus, and the active Epicurean groups in Greece, other activists are advancing the work of bringing back true Epicurean doctrine and practices.
    But these activists need your help.
    The great majority of commentary which young people come across in their studies fails to convey the core insights of Epicurean philosophy. Traditional denunciations of Epicurus abound, and even those commentators who commend Epicurus do so for reasons of their own that Epicurus would find abhorrent. Modern students need access to the small number of sources and commentaries that present Epicurean ideas accurately, professionally, and persuasively. Such resources do exist, both in the ancient texts and with modern commentators such as Frances Wright and Norman DeWitt, but it will take time and effort to compile these materials and present them for modern use on the internet.
    So here's the challenge: Please consider volunteering in our efforts. Hiram Crespo has put much work into the Society of Epicurus, and we have active discussions going on daily on the Epicurus Page and the Epicurean Philosophy Group on Facebook. Let us know, either by private email or by public posting, how we can help you help us in advancing the message of Epicurean philosophy.
    With your help, we can all profit from the study of Nature as guided by Epicurus, and with work and persistence, we can all be a part of the dawn of a new age of Epicurus.
    Note: The photo above come with permission and our appreciation from Noel Daemen, located in Maastricht in The Netherlands, where he works with Daemen3dprojecten.nl.
    Also From the Facebook Group this week:
    There were several excellent posts this week on the Facebook group, including those by Jason B. discussing the meaning of the existence of life and on evolution to see things "as they really are", and by Georges M. on Lucretius.
    Also, Christos Yapijakis, leader of the Garden of Epicurus group in Athens, Greece, penned a tribute to the recently deceased Erik Anderson, former proprietor of the Epicurus.info web page.

    Dawn of A New Age Of EpicurusIf you follow the world of politics, the last ten days in the USA have provided an important reminder: where passions run high, truth is often the first casualty. If…
    Peace and Safety For Your Twentieth of October – Tips on Epicurean Reasoning from PhilodemusPeace and Safety to the Epicureans of today, no matter where you might be! Every day, not just the Twentieth, is a good day to remember that Epicurean philosophy teaches a…
    The Epicurean “Method of Analogy” in Philodemus, And Its Vital Importance to UsWhat do we do when we are confronted by differences of opinion among people who believe very strongly in their ideals, even though those ideals vary tremendously from person to…
    “This Week In Epicurean Philosophy”For the last several years (one hundred and twenty five weeks, to be exact) I have been producing a short weekly summary of notable links and discussions on the Facebook…
    “Quantity” Does Not Equal “Type”The diagram associated with this post is intended to dramatize the question: Does any quantity of a thing ever change that thing into its opposite? When Epicurus stated that there…


    Thanks to all who participated in the Facebook forum this week. As always, if you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please add a comment or participate in the Epicurean Philosophy Facebook Group!
    - - - Live Well!
    = = = = = NOTES = = = = =
    Resources for Epicurean Philosophy On The Internet




    There are many find Epicurean websites on the internet, so be sure you are aware of the main ones. This newsletter is brought to you by www.NewEpicurean.com. Two other very active and important websites are SocietyofEpicurus.com and Menoeceus.blogspot.com
    There is also an active website in Greece (mostly in the Greek language) at Epicuros.net. Please be sure to check the list at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for a full list, and let us know if other sites should be mentioned here.
    Options for those who wish to discuss Epicurus on the internet include:1- If you are focused primarily on Epicurus, and you want to participate in a forum where people will defend Epicurus strongly from all challenges, then you have two Facebook options. Our open and main group, entitled simply "Epicurean Philosophy," is the home base of this post. Anyone can read the posts there, and all you have to do is ask in order to join. (Note that there is an "About" and a "Sticky" post with our forum rules.)
    2 - If you are someone whose views are fully formed, and you've combined several disparate viewpoints into your own personal mix, and you mainly want to talk casually to other people of the same eclectic type, there are several excellent facebook groups including EPISTOBUZEN and "Epicureanism for Modern Times." 3 - If you prefer to post in a "private" group where your posts are not readable by outsiders, we have "Epicurean Private Garden." Because it is a private group, you cannot find it by searching, and you have to email one of our admins in the open group if you wish to join. Please note that our About and Sticky Post rules in the private forum are the same as the open forum, and the private forum will be moderated to the same standards as the open forum (or perhaps slightly tighter!)
    4 - If you are not only focused primarily on Epicurus, but you wish to assist with a forum platform where pro-Epicurean activists can build for the future, check out www.EpicureanFriends.com. Work is starting on a FAQ and other resources. Anyone can read the posts, but only approved members can create new posts or comment.
    5 - If your interest is primarily on the scientific research side, such as implications of quantum mechanics and related theories, be sure to check out "Epicurean Touchpoints" at Facebook.
    Please be sure to check out the list of websites at www.EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for the latest available sites. If you know of sites that should be mentioned here, please send me an email.
    This email newsletter is brought to you by NewEpicurean.com. Copies of these posts, and a current list of links to active Epicurean websites can also be found at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.com.



    This email newsletter is brought to you by NewEpicurean.com
    To change your subscription, click here.

  • Welcome to This Week in Epicurean Philosophy for the week of 11/7/15! To subscribe (at no cost) click here.
    This is the one hundred and thirty-first in a series of weekly reports on news from the world of Epicurean Philosophy. At the Epicurean Philosophy Group we are dedicated to the study and productive discussion of Epicurean Philosophy and its application to daily life. Our goal is also, in the words of Lucian, to "strike a blow for Epicurus - that great man whose holiness and divinity of nature were not shams, who alone had and imparted true insight into the good, and who brought deliverance to all that consorted with him!"
    The Proper Starting Point
    Recently in another philosophy forum I observed a debate over the best place to start in organizing one's outlook on life. The poster was an experienced reader in philosophy and knew the official drill - that ethics is secondary to metaphysics (the nature of the universe) and to epistemology (the science of how we have confidence in what we claim to know). Nevertheless, the poster wanted to challenge that sequence and assert that it is naive to give priority to metaphysics and epistemology, because as a matter of indisputable fact the great majority of people first decide what they wish to be true in ethics - generally because they "feel" their position to be right.
    Having selected their preferred ethical positions, such people simply shop around for whatever metaphysical or epistemological viewpoints seem to strike their fancy at the moment, flipping often from one viewpoint to another. As a result, these people tend to conclude that metaphysics and epistemology are of less importance, and the very names of these branches of philosophy fade into the background of their minds.
    It takes only a brief study to see how dramatically Epicurus disagreed with this majority viewpoint. Whether one chooses to read the letters of Epicurus, the poem of Lucretius, or the inscription of Diogenes of Oinoanda, the conclusion is inescapable. The Epicurean thought process focused did not start with ethics, but started first on studying the nature of the universe, checked immediately by studying the question of how it is our observations about the universe can be deemed to be reliable.
    In a primitive world where superstition held the upper hand, it was critically important to understand that atoms and void, and not gods, provided the laws of motion and activity. It was no less important to show that despite the illusions and possibilities of error, Nature has provided us with mechanisms - faculties of observation - that can be trusted to produce reliable results. The ancient Epicureans knew that they had no hope of confidence in their theories if they could not break free of blind fear of the gods and of skeptical know-nothing philosphies. And so the only way to break free from those errors was to discover the true nature of the universe and the true nature of knowlege. It was on these foundations, and not on their personal wishes, that the Epicurean founders erected the only major Western system of thought anchored firmly in the nature of things.
    In the modern world we have flattered ourselves to believe that we no longer need these Epicurean starting points. Throwing caution to the wind and leaning fully on the promises of public education, men and women of science have entrusted generations of children to teachers who were often steeped in the same skepticism and religion which Epicurus had rebelled against.
    I find it difficult to believe that many people can still have confidence in a rosy outlook arising from modern education. Across the globe Western civilization faces challenges from anti-scientific cultural orientations, and the establishments of the West seem only to compete in rushing toward their own destruction.
    In this environment there is a great need to remind people that long before Greco-Roman civilization was itself overcome by other-worldly cultural influences two thousand years ago, the antidote to mysticism had been developed in Athens. One man had stood up and shown toe way to defeat both skeptical know-nothings in philosophy and the zealotry in religious mysticism.
    As we face those same two challenges again today, we ought to stop and look at the method of argument Epicurus chose to wage his battle. Epicurus did not start by selecting an ethical system to suit his taste. Not only did he want nothing less than the truth, Epicurus knew that only reasoned argument based on observation was enough to give one confidence that a system preferred by Nature actually existed.
    Many of us find great personal comfort in studying Epicurus and learning that the standards of the modern commercial, centralized, mystical, and yet also skeptical world are not the only standards that one can choose to follow. But even as we find personal comfort in knowing that there is nothing to fear in death, that the gods do not choose our fate, and that real happiness is possible living life here on earth, many of us face fear and anxiety worrying about the future of our relatives and friends in a world spinning out of control.
    The philosophy of Epicurus can show the way forward to both personal and community happiness. Epicurean philosophy was not defeated because it was wrong, but because having the right ideas is never sufficient for living successfully. Living successfully requires action, and as the years went by in the ancient world, those who fought for Epicurean ways of life did not develop the actions required to stem the tide of mysticism and skepticiam.
    Today, Epicurean philosophy can lead to successful action only when it is properly understood. Much work needs to be done to show the world that Epicurus pointed toward happiness, not stoic emotionlessness, as the goal of life. Likewise, people must come to see that the Epicurean method leads to confidence that our actions can be effective, not resignation that we are the playthings of fate.
    The proper place to start is to begin to follow the path first staked out thousand years ago - the trail blazed by Epicurus.
    Also from the Facebook Group this week:
    At the Epicurean Facebook group this week Illka V. posted that we should soon have access to an excellent new lecture by Stephen Greenblatt, author of "The Swerve." We also received some good news this week that even though the full Epicurus.info site is not yet back up, important parts of it are available by checking at least two other locations where mirrors have been established.
    Also, Jason B. linked to an inspiring life outlook by a 92-year old lady that rings with Epicurean perspective, and Leonard M. linked to a Yale lecture on Roman influences in the later development of Athens.
    Recent Posts at NewEpicurean.com:

    Dawn of A New Age Of EpicurusIf you follow the world of politics, the last ten days in the USA have provided an important reminder: where passions run high, truth is often the first casualty. If…
    Peace and Safety For Your Twentieth of October – Tips on Epicurean Reasoning from PhilodemusPeace and Safety to the Epicureans of today, no matter where you might be! Every day, not just the Twentieth, is a good day to remember that Epicurean philosophy teaches a…
    The Epicurean “Method of Analogy” in Philodemus, And Its Vital Importance to UsWhat do we do when we are confronted by differences of opinion among people who believe very strongly in their ideals, even though those ideals vary tremendously from person to…
    “This Week In Epicurean Philosophy”For the last several years (one hundred and twenty five weeks, to be exact) I have been producing a short weekly summary of notable links and discussions on the Facebook…
    “Quantity” Does Not Equal “Type”The diagram associated with this post is intended to dramatize the question: Does any quantity of a thing ever change that thing into its opposite? When Epicurus stated that there…


    Thanks to all who participated in the Facebook forum this week. As always, if you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please add a comment or participate in the Epicurean Philosophy Facebook Group!
    - - - Live Well!
    = = = = = NOTES = = = = =
    Resources for Epicurean Philosophy On The Internet




    There are many find Epicurean websites on the internet, so be sure you are aware of the main ones. This newsletter is brought to you by www.NewEpicurean.com. Two other very active and important websites are SocietyofEpicurus.com and Menoeceus.blogspot.com
    There is also an active website in Greece (mostly in the Greek language) at Epicuros.net. Please be sure to check the list at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for a full list, and let us know if other sites should be mentioned here.
    Options for those who wish to discuss Epicurus on the internet include:1- If you are focused primarily on Epicurus, and you want to participate in a forum where people will defend Epicurus strongly from all challenges, then you have two Facebook options. Our open and main group, entitled simply "Epicurean Philosophy," is the home base of this post. Anyone can read the posts there, and all you have to do is ask in order to join. (Note that there is an "About" and a "Sticky" post with our forum rules.)
    2 - If you are someone whose views are fully formed, and you've combined several disparate viewpoints into your own personal mix, and you mainly want to talk casually to other people of the same eclectic type, there are several excellent facebook groups including EPISTOBUZEN and "Epicureanism for Modern Times." 3 - If you prefer to post in a "private" group where your posts are not readable by outsiders, we have "Epicurean Private Garden." Because it is a private group, you cannot find it by searching, and you have to email one of our admins in the open group if you wish to join. Please note that our About and Sticky Post rules in the private forum are the same as the open forum, and the private forum will be moderated to the same standards as the open forum (or perhaps slightly tighter!)
    4 - If you are not only focused primarily on Epicurus, but you wish to assist with a forum platform where pro-Epicurean activists can build for the future, check out www.EpicureanFriends.com. Work is starting on a FAQ and other resources. Anyone can read the posts, but only approved members can create new posts or comment.
    5 - If your interest is primarily on the scientific research side, such as implications of quantum mechanics and related theories, be sure to check out "Epicurean Touchpoints" at Facebook.
    Please be sure to check out the list of websites at www.EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for the latest available sites. If you know of sites that should be mentioned here, please send me an email.
    This email newsletter is brought to you by NewEpicurean.com. Copies of these posts, and a current list of links to active Epicurean websites can also be found at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.com.

  • Welcome to This Week in Epicurean Philosophy for the week of 11/14/15! To subscribe (at no cost) click here.
    This is the one hundred and thirty-second in a series of weekly reports on news from the world of Epicurean Philosophy. At the Epicurean Philosophy Group we are dedicated to the study and productive discussion of Epicurean Philosophy and its application to daily life. Our goal is also, in the words of Lucian, to "strike a blow for Epicurus - that great man whose holiness and divinity of nature were not shams, who alone had and imparted true insight into the good, and who brought deliverance to all that consorted with him!"
    TANTUM RELIGIO POTUIT SUADERE MALORUM![u]
    [/u]
    When many people today think of Epicurean philosophy and its emphasis on "pleasure," they tend to focus on Epicurus' advice to tailor our lifestyles toward a long-term view where pleasure can be sustainable over time, rather than pursuing temporary peaks of momentary pleasure which often lead to misery. That is a very true and valuable observation, but if it is all one takes away from the study of Epicurus, some very important points will be missed.
    Some of those who study Epicurus move to the next stage, where they learn that Epicurus gave a powerful critique of religion based on deductions from natural science. Starting with the observation that nothing comes from nothing, and then adding that nothing goes to nothing, Epicurus set out a firm, understandable, and persuasive basis for grasping that the universe was not created at a single moment in time as the plaything of a god, but in fact that the universe is composed of elements that are themselves eternal, everlastingingly rearranging themselves according to the laws of nature that arise from the properties of those elements. This understanding is the essential launching-pad for freeing ourselves from fear of superstition that we are at the mercy of gods.
    But on a weekend where another Islamic terrorist atrocity has been committed in Paris, this is a good time to remember the relationship of these two fundamental Epicurean insights.
    Epicurus was the type of philosopher who integrated his ideas into a consistent whole, one supporting the other, with nothing retained in the system that was not important and fundamentally related to the other.
    In the case of "pleasure" and "the true nature of the gods," Epicurus saw a crucial relationship: Not only is the world wrong in asserting that theuniverse was created by gods, the world is wrong in thinking that these gods control the destiny of men.
    Epicurus held that the universe as a whole operates, and that individual worlds come into existence and fall apart again, according to the mechanical laws that govern the properties and movements of the elements of which the worlds consist. But Epicurus also saw that men and higher living beings do not act mechanically and totally predictably. From this observation he knew that there were other forces at work in the universe that have the capacity to break free from strict determinism.
    We know this elemental capacity that can break free of determinism by the name that comes down to us through Lucretius - The Swerve. But Epicurus went further, and observed that the free actions of living beings was not chaotic, but was itself coordinated by something that gives rise to all the forms of life we see around us. What was that coordinating force?The faculty of living beings to experience pleasure, accompanied by the corresponding faculty of experiencing pain.
    It is this force of nature - pleasure as personified by Venus - which Lucretius addresses when he says "Since thou then art sole mistress of the nature of things and without thee nothing rises up into the divine borders of light, nothing grows to be glad or lovely...."
    When one stops and thinks, it is easy to see that neither pleasure nor pain are inherent, intrinsic qualities. Neither pain nor pleasure exist in a particular object by the very "essence" of that object, as Aristotle, for instance, might have said. For example, bombs and bullets such as were unleashed on innocent people this weekend in Paris can both have beneficial and life-promoting uses when employed for the defense of the innocent, or when used to prevent the innocent from being attacked in the first place. A piece of the finest chocolate cake can be the greatest pleasure to a hungry vigorous man, or the worst torture to the emaciated dying man whose throat is too tight and dry to eat it. There is nothing in bullets or bombs that make them inherently painful in all circumstances, and nothing in chocolate cake that makes it inherently pleasing in all circumstances.
    When Epicurus delivered the world from fear of the gods, he did not leave us adrift with no motive, no guidance, and no mechanism to discern our proper path in nature. The hatred that religions have always felt toward pleasure - a hatred shared by the stoic-like philosophers who suppress emotion along with all joy in life - is motivated by the reverse of Epicurus' insight.
    The enemies of pleasure are not so stupid as to think that sex or a piece chocolate cake are the tools of Satan or the path to insanity, but they are happy for those who are not smart enough to see through their argument to think so. The enemies of pleasure know why they fight it - because pleasure is in fact the most imporant faculty given to men - more important than seeing or hearing or any other - because it is only by pleasure that we receive the ultimate guidance of nature on how to live our lives. It isthis ultimate guidance that the religions and stoic philosophies seek to replace with "holiness" or "virtue" - and which they fear the most, because the faculty of pleasure is the living repudiation of their own rejection of this world in favor of their own dreams. No matter whether those dreams are based in religious words of "god is great" or whether "reason is the highest virtue," the common theme is that these men try to convince you that nature has left you adrift and helpless, dependent on their own exclusive insights into how to live.


    In our Epicurean discussions we have quoted this before, but here is a good time to remember the words of another self-declared Epicurean. Thomas Jefferson saw through the posturing of false philosophy and false religion, and tried to tell people that neither are necessary for them to understand how to live. Instead, Jefferson wrote, nature has given us a "moral sense" - not a sense grounded in syllogisms or in revelation, but in the very natuer of man:
    "He who made us would have been a pitiful bungler, if he had made the rules of our moral conduct a matter of science. For one man of science, there are thousands who are not. What would have become of them? Man was destined for society. His morality, therefore, was to be formed to this object. He was endowed with a sense of right and wrong, merely relative to this. This sense is as much a part of his Nature, as the sense of hearing, seeing, feeling; it is the true foundation of morality, and not the [beautiful], truth, &c., as fanciful writers have imagined. The moral sense, or conscience, is as much a part of man as his leg or arm. It is given to all human beings in a stronger or weaker degree, as force of members is given them in a greater or less degree. It may be strengthened by exercise, as may any particular limb of the body. This sense is submitted, indeed, in some degree, to the guidance of reason; but it is a small stock which is required for this: even a less one than what we call common sense. State a moral case to a ploughman and a professor. The former will decide it as well, & often better than the latter, because he has not been led astray by artificial rules.



    Praying and holding candles appears to be way many in the western world's have decided to respond to their worst enemies - by begging for mercy, rather than standing up for their right to pursue happiness as Nature created them to do. But that's not the path that Epicurus blazed for us, and it's not the path that Lucretius set out for us as the Epicurean example of how to live. It's time to recall that before Lucretius wrote the words at the head of this column - "So much does religion have the power to persuade to evil deeds" - he also wrote these other words, telling us about a man of Greece who refused to bow and kneel to false religion:


    When human life to open view lay foully prostrate upon earth, crushed down under the weight of religion, who showed her head from the quarters of heaven with hideous aspect, lowering upon mortals, a man of Greece ventured first to lift up his mortal eyes to her face, and was first to withstand her to her face.
    This man neither stories of gods nor thunderbolts nor heaven with threatening roar could quell: these things only chafed the more the eager courage of his soul, filling him with desire to be the first to burst the fast bars of nature’s portals.
    Therefore the living force of his soul gained the day: on he passed, far beyond the flaming walls of the world, and traversed throughout in mind and spirit the immeasurable universe; And from there he returns a conqueror, to tell us what can, and what cannot come into being; in short, on what principle each thing has its powers defined, its deep-set boundary mark.


    Therefore religion is put underfoot and trampled upon in turn; and we his victory brings level with heaven.
    These are not the words of men who cowered in their caves at the face of danger, or who stood silent against lies about nature and the gods. These are the philosophical leaders who taught us the only thing worth fighting for is our right to live happily. Only by remembering the path that Epicurus blazed does the remnant of free, happy, Western Civilization have a chance to save itself the latest onslaught of religious zealotry and false philosophy that we have been fighting for two thousand years.


    From the Epicurean Philosophy Facebook Group this week:
    We've had a very active week at the Facebook group this week, with far too much for me to do justice to here. Special thanks go to Tadit Anderson for several very substantive posts, including this one on Benjamin Farrington, author of a book on Epicurus and on politics in the ancient world. Alexander D. started a helpful thread on "what brought about your interest in Epicurus," and Hiram started a thread to welcome new members. Justin F. posted a link to a blog entry he wrote on an Epicurean theme, and then as the week ended we had an ongoing series of posts on the Paris terrorist attack. Thanks to all who participated this week! We have much to talk about and we appreciate all who post comments, questions, or links to information of relevance to our study of Epicurus.



    Recent Posts at NewEpicurean.com:

    Dawn of A New Age Of EpicurusIf you follow the world of politics, the last ten days in the USA have provided an important reminder: where passions run high, truth is often the first casualty. If…
    Peace and Safety For Your Twentieth of October – Tips on Epicurean Reasoning from PhilodemusPeace and Safety to the Epicureans of today, no matter where you might be! Every day, not just the Twentieth, is a good day to remember that Epicurean philosophy teaches a…
    The Epicurean “Method of Analogy” in Philodemus, And Its Vital Importance to UsWhat do we do when we are confronted by differences of opinion among people who believe very strongly in their ideals, even though those ideals vary tremendously from person to…
    “This Week In Epicurean Philosophy”For the last several years (one hundred and twenty five weeks, to be exact) I have been producing a short weekly summary of notable links and discussions on the Facebook…
    “Quantity” Does Not Equal “Type”The diagram associated with this post is intended to dramatize the question: Does any quantity of a thing ever change that thing into its opposite? When Epicurus stated that there…


    Thanks to all who participated in the Facebook forum this week. As always, if you have any comments, questions, or suggestions, please add a comment or participate in the Epicurean Philosophy Facebook Group!
    - - - Live Well!
    = = = = = NOTES = = = = =
    Resources for Epicurean Philosophy On The Internet




    There are many find Epicurean websites on the internet, so be sure you are aware of the main ones. This newsletter is brought to you by www.NewEpicurean.com. Two other very active and important websites are SocietyofEpicurus.com and Menoeceus.blogspot.com
    There is also an active website in Greece (mostly in the Greek language) at Epicuros.net. Please be sure to check the list at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for a full list, and let us know if other sites should be mentioned here.
    Options for those who wish to discuss Epicurus on the internet include:1- If you are focused primarily on Epicurus, and you want to participate in a forum where people will defend Epicurus strongly from all challenges, then you have two Facebook options. Our open and main group, entitled simply "Epicurean Philosophy," is the home base of this post. Anyone can read the posts there, and all you have to do is ask in order to join. (Note that there is an "About" and a "Sticky" post with our forum rules.)
    2 - If you are someone whose views are fully formed, and you've combined several disparate viewpoints into your own personal mix, and you mainly want to talk casually to other people of the same eclectic type, there are several excellent facebook groups including EPISTOBUZEN and "Epicureanism for Modern Times." 3 - If you prefer to post in a "private" group where your posts are not readable by outsiders, we have "Epicurean Private Garden." Because it is a private group, you cannot find it by searching, and you have to email one of our admins in the open group if you wish to join. Please note that our About and Sticky Post rules in the private forum are the same as the open forum, and the private forum will be moderated to the same standards as the open forum (or perhaps slightly tighter!)
    4 - If you are not only focused primarily on Epicurus, but you wish to assist with a forum platform where pro-Epicurean activists can build for the future, check out www.EpicureanFriends.com. Work is starting on a FAQ and other resources. Anyone can read the posts, but only approved members can create new posts or comment.
    5 - If your interest is primarily on the scientific research side, such as implications of quantum mechanics and related theories, be sure to check out "Epicurean Touchpoints" at Facebook.
    Please be sure to check out the list of websites at www.EpicurusCentral.wordpress.net for the latest available sites. If you know of sites that should be mentioned here, please send me an email.
    This email newsletter is brought to you by NewEpicurean.com. Copies of these posts, and a current list of links to active Epicurean websites can also be found at EpicurusCentral.wordpress.com.