User Tools

Site Tools


vatican_list_of_sayings

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
Next revision
Previous revision
vatican_list_of_sayings [2018/10/26 07:07]
cassiusamicus
vatican_list_of_sayings [2019/10/12 08:41] (current)
cassiusamicus
Line 1: Line 1:
 ====== The Vatican List Of The Sayings Of Epicurus ====== ====== The Vatican List Of The Sayings Of Epicurus ======
 +
 +As of 10/12/19, the most up-to-date version of this list is maintained [[https://​www.epicureanfriends.com/​wcf/​index.php?​vatican-list-of-sayings/​|within the main site at Epicureanfriends.com. ]] This page will remain in place for reference purposes, but please refer to [[https://​www.epicureanfriends.com/​wcf/​index.php?​vatican-list-of-sayings/​|the main Epicureanfriends.com version]] for the most reliable current version.
  
 This list by an unknown author was discovered in 1888 at the Vatican and is reputed to date from the fourteenth century. This list by an unknown author was discovered in 1888 at the Vatican and is reputed to date from the fourteenth century.
  
-Translated ​by Cyril Bailey ​Oxford, 1926The following text is by Cyril Bailey ​except where noted. References to the Epicurus Reader are to the work by Brad Inwood and L.P. Gerson, Hackett Publishing, 1994. References to DeWitt are to "​Epicurus and His Philosophy"​ by Norman W. DeWitt, 1954.+The following translations are by Cyril Bailey ​(Oxford, 1926 "​Epicurus, ​The Extant Remains"​) ​except where noted. References to the Epicurus Reader are to the work by Brad Inwood and L.P. Gerson, Hackett Publishing, 1994. References to DeWitt are to "​Epicurus and His Philosophy"​ by Norman W. DeWitt, 1954.
  
 [[:vs_01|VS 01]] A blessed and indestructible being has no trouble himself and brings no trouble upon any other being; so he is free from anger and partiality, for all such things imply weakness. [[:vs_01|VS 01]] A blessed and indestructible being has no trouble himself and brings no trouble upon any other being; so he is free from anger and partiality, for all such things imply weakness.
Line 31: Line 33:
 [[:vs_13|VS 13]] Among the things held to be just by law, whatever is proved to be of advantage in men’s dealings has the stamp of justice, whether or not it be the same for all; but if a man makes a law and it does not prove to be mutually advantageous,​ then this is no longer just. And if what is mutually advantageous varies and only for a time corresponds to our concept of justice, nevertheless for that time it is just for those who do not trouble themselves about empty words, but look simply at the facts. (see Principle Doctrine 37) [[:vs_13|VS 13]] Among the things held to be just by law, whatever is proved to be of advantage in men’s dealings has the stamp of justice, whether or not it be the same for all; but if a man makes a law and it does not prove to be mutually advantageous,​ then this is no longer just. And if what is mutually advantageous varies and only for a time corresponds to our concept of justice, nevertheless for that time it is just for those who do not trouble themselves about empty words, but look simply at the facts. (see Principle Doctrine 37)
  
-[[:vs_14|VS 14]] We are born once and cannot be born twice, but for all time must be no more. But you, who are not master of tomorrow, postpone your happiness. Life is wasted in procrastination and each one of us dies without allowing himself leisure.+[[:vs_14|VS 14]] We are born once and cannot be born twice, but for all time must be no more. But you, who are not master of tomorrow, postpone your happiness. Life is wasted in procrastination and each one of us dies occupied. [Note: the Bailey translation ends with "without allowing himself leisure" rather than "​occupied."​ The [[http://​wiki.epicurism.info/​Vatican_Saying_14/​|Epicurus wiki]] uses the word "busy."]
  
 [[:vs_15|VS 15]] We value our characters as something peculiar to ourselves, whether they are good and we are esteemed by men or not, so ought we value the characters of others, if they are well-disposed to us. [[:vs_15|VS 15]] We value our characters as something peculiar to ourselves, whether they are good and we are esteemed by men or not, so ought we value the characters of others, if they are well-disposed to us.
Line 45: Line 47:
 [[:vs_20|VS 20]] Of our desires some are natural and necessary, others are natural but not necessary; and others are neither natural nor necessary, but are due to groundless opinion. (see Principle Doctrine 29) [[:vs_20|VS 20]] Of our desires some are natural and necessary, others are natural but not necessary; and others are neither natural nor necessary, but are due to groundless opinion. (see Principle Doctrine 29)
  
-[[:vs_21|]] We must not violate nature, but obey her; and we shall obey her if we fulfil those desires that are necessary, and also those that are natural but bring no harm to us, but we must sternly reject those that are harmful. Note: Follow the link [[:vs_21|]] for discussion of how Bailey'​s translation can be improved.+[[:vs_21|VS 21]] We must not violate nature, but obey her; and we shall obey her if we fulfil those desires that are necessary, and also those that are natural but bring no harm to us, but we must sternly reject those that are harmful. Note: Follow the link [[:vs_21|]] for discussion of how Bailey'​s translation can be improved.
  
 [[:vs_22|VS 22]] Unlimited time and limited time afford an equal amount of pleasure, if we measure the limits of that pleasure by reason. (see Principle Doctrine 19) [[:vs_22|VS 22]] Unlimited time and limited time afford an equal amount of pleasure, if we measure the limits of that pleasure by reason. (see Principle Doctrine 19)
Line 61: Line 63:
 [[:vs_28|VS 28]] We must not approve either those who are always ready for friendship, or those who hang back, but for friendship’s sake we must run risks. [[:vs_28|VS 28]] We must not approve either those who are always ready for friendship, or those who hang back, but for friendship’s sake we must run risks.
  
-[[:vs_29|VS 29]] For I would certainly prefer as I study Nature to announce frankly what is beneficial to all people, even if none agrees with me, rather than to compromise with common opinions and thus reap the frequent praise of the many.  (translation by C.Yapijakis,​ Epicurean Garden of Athens, Greece) ​ [Bailey: ​ In investigating nature I would prefer to speak openly and like an oracle to give answers serviceable to all mankind, even though no one should understand me, rather than to conform to popular opinions and so win the praise freely scattered by the mob.]+[[:vs_29|VS 29]] For I would certainly prefer as I study Nature to announce frankly what is beneficial to all people, even if none agrees with me, rather than to compromise with common opinions and thus reap the frequent praise of the many. (translation by C.Yapijakis,​ Epicurean Garden of Athens, Greece) [Bailey: In investigating nature I would prefer to speak openly and like an oracle to give answers serviceable to all mankind, even though no one should understand me, rather than to conform to popular opinions and so win the praise freely scattered by the mob.]
  
 [[:vs_30|VS 30]] Some men throughout their lives spend their time gathering together the means of life, for they do not see that the draught swallowed by all of us at birth is a draught of death. [[:vs_30|VS 30]] Some men throughout their lives spend their time gathering together the means of life, for they do not see that the draught swallowed by all of us at birth is a draught of death.
Line 73: Line 75:
 [[:vs_34|VS 34]] It is not so much our friends’ help that helps us as it is the confidence of their help. [[:vs_34|VS 34]] It is not so much our friends’ help that helps us as it is the confidence of their help.
  
-[[:vs_35|VS 35]] DeWitt: ​ We must not spoil the enjoyment of the blessings we have by pining for those we have not but rather reflect that these too are among the things desirable. ​ Peter St. Andre: Don't ruin the things you have by wanting what you don't have, but realize that they too are things you once did wish for.  [The version of this text by Bailey appears clearly incorrect: ​ "We should not spoil what we have by desiring what we do not have, but remember that what we have too was the gift of fortune."​+[[:vs_35|VS 35]] DeWitt: We must not spoil the enjoyment of the blessings we have by pining for those we have not but rather reflect that these too are among the things desirable. Peter St. Andre: Don't ruin the things you have by wanting what you don't have, but realize that they too are things you once did wish for. [The version of this text by Bailey appears clearly incorrect: "We should not spoil what we have by desiring what we do not have, but remember that what we have too was the gift of fortune."​
  
 [[:vs_36|VS 36]] Epicurus’ life when compared to other men’s in respect of gentleness and self-sufficiency might be thought a mere legend. [[:vs_36|VS 36]] Epicurus’ life when compared to other men’s in respect of gentleness and self-sufficiency might be thought a mere legend.
Line 97: Line 99:
 [[:vs_46|VS 46]] Let us utterly drive from us our bad habits as if they were evil men who have long done us great harm. [[:vs_46|VS 46]] Let us utterly drive from us our bad habits as if they were evil men who have long done us great harm.
  
-[[:vs_47|VS 47]] I have anticipated thee, Fortune, and entrenched myself against all thy secret attacks. And I will not give myself up as captive to thee or to any other circumstance;​ but when it is time for me to go, spitting contempt on life and on those who vainly cling to it, I will leave life crying aloud a glorious triumph-song that I have lived well.+[[:vs_47|VS 47]] I have anticipated thee, Fortune, and entrenched myself against all thy secret attacks. And I will not give myself up as captive to thee or to any other circumstance;​ but when it is time for me to go, spitting contempt on life and on those who vainly cling to it, I will leave life crying aloud a glorious triumph-song that I have lived well. [This translation is from Bailey, but **a better translation is found at the link to the left**.]
  
 [[:vs_48|VS 48]] We must try to make the end of the journey better than the beginning, as long as we are journeying; but when we come to the end, we must be happy and content. [[:vs_48|VS 48]] We must try to make the end of the journey better than the beginning, as long as we are journeying; but when we come to the end, we must be happy and content.
Line 141: Line 143:
 [[:vs_68|VS 68]] Nothing is sufficient for him to whom what is sufficient seems too little. [[:vs_68|VS 68]] Nothing is sufficient for him to whom what is sufficient seems too little.
  
-[[:vs_69|VS 69]] The ungrateful greed of the soul makes the creature everlastingly desire varieties ​of in its lifestyle.+[[:vs_69|VS 69]] The ungrateful greed of the soul makes the creature everlastingly desire varieties in its lifestyle.
  
 [[:vs_70|VS 70]] Let nothing be done in your life which will cause you fear if it becomes known to your neighbor. [[:vs_70|VS 70]] Let nothing be done in your life which will cause you fear if it becomes known to your neighbor.
vatican_list_of_sayings.1540552021.txt.gz · Last modified: 2018/10/26 07:07 by cassiusamicus