User Tools

Site Tools


paraphrase_of_book_1

Differences

This shows you the differences between two versions of the page.

Link to this comparison view

Both sides previous revision Previous revision
paraphrase_of_book_1 [2019/03/09 12:06]
cassiusamicus
paraphrase_of_book_1 [2019/03/09 12:12] (current)
cassiusamicus
Line 21: Line 21:
 [113] The problem is that we are confused about the nature of the soul - whether it is formed with the body at birth, and then perishes with the body at death, or whether it survives death to descend into Hell, as poets such as Ennius have taught. Poets such has he have told tales in immortal poems about places where souls wander for eternity in never-ending pain. [113] The problem is that we are confused about the nature of the soul - whether it is formed with the body at birth, and then perishes with the body at death, or whether it survives death to descend into Hell, as poets such as Ennius have taught. Poets such has he have told tales in immortal poems about places where souls wander for eternity in never-ending pain.
  
-[126] So in order to set you straight about all these things, we shall study together the nature of all things, the forces by which the Sun and Moon run their courses in the sky, by what power all things in Earth and Heaven were formed. ​ But even more importantly,​ we will study together the nature of the human soul, and how we see some things around us clearly, but how we also sometimes think we see other things which scare us, even such things as ghosts of people who we know are long dead.+[126] So in order to set you straight about all these things, we shall study together the nature of all things, the forces by which the Sun and Moon run their courses in the sky, by what power all things in Earth and Heaven were formed. But even more importantly,​ we will study together the nature of the human soul, and how we see some things around us clearly, but how we also sometimes think we see other things which scare us, even such things as ghosts of people who we know are long dead.
  
 [137] It is hard to explain all these details in words, but with patience, friends, and with the pleasure we will get from our study together, we can work through all these issues and open our minds to scenes of light which will open up to us the hidden qualities of things previously unknown. [137] It is hard to explain all these details in words, but with patience, friends, and with the pleasure we will get from our study together, we can work through all these issues and open our minds to scenes of light which will open up to us the hidden qualities of things previously unknown.
  
-[145] These terrors of the mind, this darkness then, not the Sun’s beams, ​nor the bright rays of daycan e’er dispelbut Nature’s light and reason; Whose first of principles shall be my guide: Nothing ​was by the Gods of nothing ​made. For hence it is that fear disturbs the mindthat strange events in Earth and Heaven are seen, whose causes ​cannot ​appear by reason’s eye, and then we say they were from Powers Divine. But when we rest convinced that nothing can arise from nothing, then the way is clear to our pursuit; ​we distinctly ​see whence every thing comes into being, and how things are formed ​without the help and trouble of the Gods.+[145] Just remember: ​ Darkness and terrors of the mind cannot be dispelled by the Sun’s beams, ​but only through ​the study and understanding ​of Nature. 
 + 
 +And herefirstin all that follows, remember this first principle which will always ​be our guide: ​ Nothing ​has ever been made from nothing, even by gods ​It ​is because we do not understand ​that fear can sometimes grip our minds, and than when we see strange things that we cannot ​understand ​we attribute them to the work of gods. But as soon as we understand and are convinced that  nothing can come from nothing, then the way is clear to our understanding of nature, and we will see how everything which comes into being occurs ​without the help or the trouble of the Gods.
  
 [160] If things proceed from nothing, every thing might spring from any thing, and want no seed; Men from the sea might first arise, and fish and birds break from the Earth, and herds and tender flocks drop from the sky, and every kind of beast fix’d to no certain place, might find a being in deserts or in cultivated fields: Nor the same fruit on the same trees would grow, but would be chang’d, and all things all things bear. For had not every thing its genial seed, how is it that every thing derives its birth from causes still the same? But now, since things are formed from certain seeds, and first rise into light, where every being has its principles and matter fitly framed, from hence we see that all things cannot spring from every thing, since each has certain secret properties peculiar to itself. [160] If things proceed from nothing, every thing might spring from any thing, and want no seed; Men from the sea might first arise, and fish and birds break from the Earth, and herds and tender flocks drop from the sky, and every kind of beast fix’d to no certain place, might find a being in deserts or in cultivated fields: Nor the same fruit on the same trees would grow, but would be chang’d, and all things all things bear. For had not every thing its genial seed, how is it that every thing derives its birth from causes still the same? But now, since things are formed from certain seeds, and first rise into light, where every being has its principles and matter fitly framed, from hence we see that all things cannot spring from every thing, since each has certain secret properties peculiar to itself.
paraphrase_of_book_1.txt · Last modified: 2019/03/09 12:12 by cassiusamicus