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  • There are a number of versions of the so-called “golden rule” across cultures. In the Judeo-Christian tradition there are two: The first is by Rabbi Hillel (died circa 10CE) “What is hateful to you, do not do to your neighbour.” The second is attributed to Jesus of Galilee in the gospels of Matthew and Luke: “Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.” The first (Hillel’s version) is negatively formed – and I have often preferred it, sometimes wishing to tell some well-meaning person: “P…
  • We all agree on the prohibitive (negative) formulation – and its importance. (And that is, apparently, the most common type of formulation – not only in ancient Greece but other cultures as well.) There remains a twofold question: Are there (in the classical Epicurean corpus) any similar affirmative statements on: 1) where reasonably possible, to prevent or stop wrongful harm from being done to another (particularly someone outside our immediate friendship circle); and 2) to foster social condit…
  • Thanks all. Nate: Yes, I like the simplicity of that. Joshua: That's the kind of stuff I was looking for. Cassius: I agree with your take. I think all "command moralities" are idealist, Kant no less than the Stoics or other "divine command" types. Again, thanks all.