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  • Here's the Greek: Ὁ θάνατος οὐδὲν πρὸς ἡμᾶς· τὸ γὰρ διαλυθὲν ἀναισθητεῖ· τὸ δ’ ἀναισθητοῦν οὐδὲν πρὸς ἡμᾶς. Ὁ θάνατος οὐδὲν πρὸς ἡμᾶς· literally "Death is nothing for us." διαλυθὲν - passive aorist of διαλυω 2. to dissolve into its elements, to break up ἀναίσθητος I. unconscious, insensate, unfeeling; senseless Here's my translation: "Death is nothing to us, for that which is dissolved into its elements is without consciousness, and that which is without consciousness is nothing to us."
  • (Quote from Cassius) I appreciate that. I'm giving it all she's got, Captain The word in question is ἀναίσθητος anaisthētos. http://www.perseus.tufts.edu/h…rior=a)naisqhte/w#lexicon Look like any English word? It's the basis of "anaesthesia" when we don't feel or sense anything. I think you're on the right track with the complementary Canon. Another pertinent fact is the word διαλυθὲν dialythen which has the connotation of being dissolved or broken up into pieces or into elements. So, once death…
  • It seems to me two things are getting conflated here. Let me sort them out, for myself if not for anyone else. What is good or bad for me personally is determined by whether the action or thought elicits pleasure or pain for me, either in the short or the long term. There is no absolute Good or absolute Evil for me personally apart from my reaction of Pleasure or Pain. What is good or bad for society is determined by whether actions are just or not. Whether something is just or not is if it (a) …