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  • PD 26 says "All desires that do not lead to pain when they remain unsatisfied are unnecessary, but the desire is easily got rid of, when the thing desired is difficult to obtain or the desires seem likely to produce harm." So not all desires produce pain, so Epicurus concept of desire was not quite so black and white.
  • Sadly I won't be able to make it Wednesday, but I'll add to the discussion. Metrodorus in on wealth talks about enduring pains in the present in order to avoid greater pain or gain greater pleasure in the future, from which we derive the concept of hedonic calculus. To me that sets the whole philosophy up to be a kind of psychological math problem. Which is why I like it so much, the idea that there's a formula for happiness. Just solve for x. Everyone's y might be different but x should be the …
  • It's from Philodemus, quotes or paraphrasing depending on the scholar, Metrodorus. Philodemus and Metrodorus are on the same page throughout: successful property-management is neither following the Cynics and living in a tub to avoid the bother, nor getting so obsessed with it as to be (in Philodemus’ vivid—if restored—phrase) “trapping oneself on treadmills” (XIV.28). It is taking trouble, but trouble that will pay off and help not just you but your friends (is allakton for greater pleasure, XV…