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  • Garden Dweller in any discussion like this the text that immediately comes to mind is VS63. I don't think it is cited very often by modern commentators and it is clear why they don't: The Bailey version is "63. Frugality too has a limit, and the man who disregards it is like him who errs through excess." and Epicurus.net has a more clear version: "63. There is also a limit in simple living, and he who fails to understand this falls into an error as great as that of the man who gives way to extr…
  • Also, it may seem trite to cite this one, but I think the points in the last post add up to this one, Vatican Saying 71: Question each of your desires: “What will happen to me if that which this desire seeks is achieved, and what if it is not?” That may not seem like much help as a general rule, but it reinforces how circumstances are subjective and will lead to different choices in different situations.
  • (Quote from Godfrey)I've been thinking a lot about this. It is certainly true to a degree, but there are important limitations. It is almost like, today, many of the details have been accepted, but the implications have been divorced from them and totally lost. With the advent of the omnipotent / omniscient version of god, the problem of "how does a god control what we now know to be atoms, and to be endless space" has been overthrown. No one cares that the universe is endless, or eternal, and …
  • I think that's a good start on a practical approach, and it certainly illustrates the process! This reminds me Garden Dweller of our fairly recent discussion of a "Pleasure Maximizaton Worksheet." If you have not seen that you might find it interesting to bounce your current thinking against that approach. I did not end up developing it further for a variety of reasons, but what you are doing is similar to any approach which provides suggested guidelines and suggests a way to weigh and balance …
  • Just glancing over the forums I see the thread is entitled "...Finding THE Path." Maybe that is one of our points here, that there is not a single path for everyone, not even a single best bath for the same person. However, maybe no matter the number of paths, it is correct to call it direct or straight(?) Which reminds me to compare this passage from the opening of Lucretius 6:Munro: " He therefore cleansed men’s breasts with truth-telling precepts and fixed a limit to lust and fear and explai…
  • Lately I have been trying to discipline myself to transcribe at least a couple of paragraphs of Lucretius every morning before work, and that has been a help to make sure I get it done and prevent it from being pushed aside. These are pretty ordinary observations and there's nothing magic in them, but routine and habit can be very helpful.
  • Right they aren't mutually contradictory at all, but that's the point: it would be wrong to always think that long-term is better.
  • To add to Hiram's point, we know that Epicurus also had slaves, so that would obviously not be a lifestyle that we can or should duplicate. That's a pretty dramatic example of the dangers of thinking that Epicurus himself lived a particularly ascetic / minimal existence, which I don't think the facts would support. In addition, I am not aware that any of the other examples of specific Epicureans we know about from history were noted for gardening or raising their own sustenance or really were i…