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  • 1 - My main LARP is my avatar -- that is from the movie "The Last Legion" One day I am going to have to buy a Roman helmet like that! My real life is excruciatingly boring in comparison. Anyone like to read some insurance policies with me? But it pays the bills and allows me the time to pursue Epicurean philosophy. 2 - YES I have been to the Parthenon in Nashville and it is great! I highly recommend it. I've actually been twice, once about 20+ years ago, and once about three years ago. It is imp…
  • I wonder if there is any site in the USA that is more directly tied to ancient Greece, and yet is so relatively unknown, as the Parthenon in Nashville. In fact, I wonder if there's any site in the world, even in Greece, that can match this! I doubt the reiigious nuts in most of the world would allow something like this, even in replica. Quite impressive in person:
  • There's an idea! We can have a competition: What locations in North America have greatest connection to / significance for Epicurean Philosophy? I have now split this out as a separate thread. Let's call for nominations! Here are three: 1. The Getty Museum in California - http://www.getty.edu/visit/villa/ 2. The Parthenon in Nashville - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Parthenon_(Nashville) 3. Monticello (Where Jefferson wrote about Epicurus and met with Frances Wright and presumably talked about "…
  • What locations in North America have greatest connection to or significance for Epicurean Philosophy? Elli's recent post of herself at an Epicurean shrine spurs me to ask whether we could assemble a list of locations relevant to Epicurus for those of us in North American. Here are three possibilities for a list: 1. The Getty Museum in California - http://www.getty.edu/visit/villa/ (Obvious connection to Philodemus and his library, leaping pig, statues of the founders, etc.) 2. The Parthenon in N…
  • Yes it seems to me that Frances Wright's gravesite and/or other places associated with her would definitely be a good addition to this list. "A Few Days In Athens" is not only an excellent book, it probably qualifies as the most unabashedly pro-Epicurean and consistently-Epicurean piece of writing since the ancient world. So many others are sort or / kind of / approximately Epicurean, but I would put AFDIA is in a class of its own.
  • WAIT -- I don't think I noticed this before: So this James Milne who brought up Frances Wright was JOHN STUART MILLS' FATHER? A Few Days In Athens was published in 1822 in London. Frances Wright was born September 6, 1795, so in 1822 she was 27 years old. At that time James Mill was 49 years old. These are Mills' works and dates of publication: Major works An essay of the impolicy of a bounty on the exportation of grain, 1804. "Lord Lauderdale on Public Wealth", 1804, Literary Journal Vol. IV, N…