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  • (Quote from Dubitator314) Yep (from my perspective) For me, it goes back to Epicurus's assertion in his Principle Doctrine 5: "It is not possible to live a pleasurable life without the traits of wisdom, morality, and justice; and it is impossible to live with wisdom, morality, and justice without living pleasurably. When one of these is lacking, it is impossible to live a pleasurable life. It is not possible to live a pleasurable life without the traits of wisdom, morality, and justice; and it i…
  • (Quote from Dubitator314) Another quick thought... I would be careful about that phrasing. If you're equating an "ethical action" with a "virtuous action", remember that virtue in Epicureanism is instrumental to pleasure and not an end in itself. Why do we practice virtuous acts? Because they bring us pleasure. Okay, now I'll step back and let others chime in.
  • The closest Epicurus ever gets to an "absolute" is his basis for just actions in society: to neither harm nor be harmed. But this isn't an absolute decree from some higher supernatural authority. It's simply his proposed "natural" baseline agreement that a community needs to function.
  • (Quote from JJElbert) Hey, how do I give two thumbs up? PS There we go!