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  • Seems that Catherine Wilson has taken on Nussbaum: https://www.thephilosopher1923.org/review-morgan-wilson Part of the criticism stems from the insinuation that people can not be trusted with moral relativism. I’m not sure where I stand with that.
  • at the crux of this issue are two facts: 1. my oldest brother is an alcoholic and seems sure that he will never be able to quit or stop being an alcoholic. 2. my neighbor and good friend is a recovering alcoholic also and I've visited AA meeting as a friend / family / ally in support of him. He says "idle hands do the devil's work" and that he does not believe that many addicts will stop themselves from engaging in their behavior if they're bored or idle. So we know that morality is never absol…
  • (Quote from Elayne) Elayne I do not accept absolutism. Maybe you misread me, but thanks for your initiative at frankness. I accept relativism, and also can appreciate the merits of the moral realism expressed by Polystratus, our third Scholarch, in "on irrational contempt". What I did say is that Catherine posits her challenge to Nussbaum in terms of _whether people can be trusted with_ moral relativism. This is a different question than whether there is an absolute morality. Nussbaum does not …
  • (Quote from Cassius)Sounds good in theory, but in practice this or any other form of anarchism will risk becoming Somalia. The absence of state power and its monopoly on violence will allow evil ideologies to rise to the top (whether Christian or White supremacists in the US, or Islamists in Somalia) and society may degenerate into a pre-civilized state of savagery. I think this type of doctrinal libertarianism is as naïve and dangerous as any of the traditional religions.
  • (Quote from Elayne)Hmmm … I don't hesitate to teach Epicureanism to those who are "armed for happiness", as Epicurus said in "On Nature". But I am sincerely interested in the question of whether we should trust others, and in particular certain people, with moral relativism. I think this is an interesting challenge and I do not have an answer for it yet. We have observed religious people engaged in all kinds of hypocrisy, but also people for whom it makes a difference between being faithful to …
  • (Quote from Cassius)No, that would require too many answers that we don't have...
  • “Answers we don’t have” — I suppose I was thinking that people have not tried every possible model of government and also that we do not know all there is to know about human nature. Or maybe that human nature is too complex and varied to make universal assumptions. Questions about ideal Governments usually rely on assumptions about human nature.